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> Tuba & Banjo or String Bass & guitar?, Tuba & Banjo or String Bass & guitar?
Tuba & Banjo or String Bass & guitar?
Tuba & Banjo or String Bass & guitar?
Tuba & Banjo [ 4 ] ** [80.00%]
String Bass & guitar [ 1 ] ** [20.00%]
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gregoryagogo
post Oct 9 2004, 12:52 PM
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In Swing, there is all these lyric references to the bass and guitar... I think it's funny that before swing took hold, the Tuba and Banjo were used. Which do you perfer and why?!


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Vladimir Berkov
post Oct 11 2004, 09:31 PM
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I very much enjoy the element the banjo and ukulele added to the music of the period.
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Fredrik
post Oct 12 2004, 01:39 AM
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Actually I wouldn't mind having all four of them, like for example Whiteman, Nat Shilkret, Isham Jones and other big bands had at the end of the 1920s, but if I have to chose I'll go for the "old-fashioned" instrumentation.

Fredrik
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gregoryagogo
post Oct 13 2004, 10:46 PM
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I feel like the Tuba is like a little jet enging propelling or even farting me around a little merry-go-round! The more rumble, the better! Then add bells or vibraphone... I'm in heaven!

When I edit the sound in "Pro-Edit" software, one of my favorite things to do is make a loop of my favorite riff in the song. The sick part of my brain is that I can listen to that loop for hundreds of times. When it would drive most people crazy, I go round and round even more!!


Gregory


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rocky
post Oct 15 2004, 02:10 AM
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One of the things I like most about my old dance records is the banjo accompaniment. I find it disheartening that within a year or two of the introduction of electric music, the banjo was replaced by the drum. There were differences in the sound of the banjo accompaniment based on the dance band and the record label. For instance, the banjo on Whiteman's 1921 "Learn to Smile" is very typical of banjo accompaniment of that time. A similar banjo sound is also displalyed on records by the Happy Six and the Columbians Dance Orchestra. The banjo sound on Edison dance tunes from the 1922-26 period is loud and prominent--almost a sledgehammer effect.

The Varsity Eight (a California Ramblers subset that recorded for Cameo in the 20's) probably used the tuba more prominently than any other dance band 80 years ago. Some of their songs are available at the Redhotjazz site and there is also a CD of their songs (check Worlds Records).
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gregoryagogo
post Oct 16 2004, 07:45 PM
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http://www. jazz.com/songs/whiteman/lrnsmile.ram


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Jarred
post Oct 18 2004, 12:47 AM
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I like the guitar-bass recordings made by bands during the 1931-1936 period. They were more prominent in the band's sound then. On 1940s recordings, they're hardly noticable. One of my favorite rhythm sections of all time is the Benny Goodman band's from 1935-1936. They could really go to town. The Casa Loma Orchestra, and the Fletcher Henderson, and Claude Hopkins bands also had a good guitar/bass rhythm.
I still like tuba recordings from the 1920s, but I'm not a big fan of the banjo. I did notice that there's a tuba present on Tommy Dorsey's 1944 recording of "Opus 1". He didn't use one very much, but you can really point it out toward the end of that recording. Also, Spike Jones did a swing spoof of " When Yuba Plays The Rumba On The Tuba" from 1946. Clearly, the instrument hadn't vanished entirely.


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Fredrik
post Oct 18 2004, 06:58 AM
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QUOTE
The Varsity Eight (a California Ramblers subset that recorded for Cameo in the 20's) probably used the tuba more prominently than any other dance band 80 years ago.


Actually I think you'll find that there is no tuba at all on these records (or any other discs by small contingents from the California Ramblers) since the bass instrument on these is a bass saxophone, generally played by the multi-talented Adrian Rollini.

Later recordings by the full California Ramblers (from circa 1928 on) do feature tuba though.

Fredrik
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