IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 Forum Rules 
3 Pages V   1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Music of the 1920's & 1930's, What started your interest ?
jackhylton
post Jul 8 2004, 04:40 PM
Post #1


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 8
Joined: 3-July 04
From: United Kingdom
Member No.: 171



I imagine the majority of listeners to radio Dismuke weren't around when the music we listen to was played and recorded.
I thought it would be an interesting topic to start off a discussion on 'what started your interest in 1920's & 1930's music'
I was born 1963 so I wasn't around at the time our music was recorded.
I remember in my early teens a pal had an old radiogramme and pile of 78's given. We got it going and worked our way through the pile of records playing what we thought would be interesting.
I found I quite liked the few records from UK dance bands.
I tuned in to local radio stations in search of this type of music and found a couple of weekly shows. Not all the music was from dance bands some music hall and later post war stuff.
A feature in my local paper about a small record shop selling 78's and wind up gramophones. I went over to this shop and was hooked. There was inside wall to wall 78's ! not all of them I liked but I managed to find a selection every week.
The owner would sit behind the counter. You could only just see him for the piles of 78's brought in by people every week from their attics. These were the ones I had alook through 'anything new in ?' I would ask.
I met a couple of young local collectors and found I wasn't the only 16yr old interested in dance band music!
My collection of 78's grew in the early 80's. I have about 800 now this has been static for years.
I look out for re issues on CD now.
Radio Dismuke is abosolutely brill ! just what I've been looking for for years! I just wish computers and the net was around in my teenage years.
Keep the records spinning Dismuke smile.gif

Brian (AKA jackhylton)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ian House
post Jul 15 2004, 07:22 AM
Post #2


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 1190
Joined: 30-November 03
Member No.: 85



Hi Brian,

I'd like to answer your question as I feel that my "origin story" may be a little different than most. You and I are roughly of the same vintage although we grew up on different sides of the big pond. I can give credit to one individual alone for my lifelong passion for Jazz Age music. His name is Carl Stalling... Who? ... Carl Stalling was the musical director that composed the arrangements for most of the Leon Schlesinger cartoons of the 30s which formally evolved into the Warner Bros. cartoon studio of the 40s and 50s which featured the Looney Tunes & Merrie Melodies series. His career spanned the years from 1936 to 1958. During that period, he was responsible for literally hundreds of cartoon soundtracks each of which featured at least a few popular songs, sometimes instrumental, sometimes vocal but always in the form of a medley. Although most of his arrangements were created in the 40s and 50s, he, thankfully, seemed to be inspired mostly by the music of the 20s and 30s. Songs like "Ain't She Sweet" and "Ain't We Got Fun" were well-worn standards by the end of his career. He loved to use Harry Warren. And he was particularly fond of the novelty music of Raymond Scott (if you're not familiar with Raymond Scott, just type "Raymond Scott" and "Powerhouse" into Google) This is just a tiny list of the hundreds of popular songs that he used in those cartoons.

The Bugs Bunny Show debuted (in North America) on ABC television back in 1961, the same year that I made my own personal debut! Let's just say we've grown up together. To this day, I cherish those films and still marvel at the sophisticated musical arrangements therein. Each one of those Jazz melodies has been in my psyche since day one. My early interest in Warner animation naturally lead me to investigate other studios and film animation in general. Once having discovered the Max Fleischer studio, I also discovered Cab Calloway, my favorite male vocalist. He "appeared" (he was rotoscoped) in three Fleischer cartoons from the 30s singing his favorites. I sat there drooling.

All of this "in the closet" cartoon watching was done as my parents were listening to Benny Goodman and Glen Miller in the living room. I used to joke with them: How can you guys listen to all that new stuff? I have always been a musical weirdo -that is, I've never had any interest in the music enjoyed by my own generation -or even my parents' generation!.

Until very recently, I have never pursued the original 78s. My entire listening collection is on CD. Before the advent of the CD, I relied on those wonderful cartoons and my somewhat well-developed ability to whistle and hum... And now, with Radio Dismuke, we can toss it all away and simply tune in...

That's my story (and I'm sticking to it)

Carl Stalling also introduced me to classical music for all the same reasons.

Thank you Carl, I owe you dearly.

Ian


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Eddie
post Jul 16 2004, 09:06 PM
Post #3


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 16-July 04
Member No.: 174



My own interest in 30's music was accidental, and recent. Looking for some new music to listen to one night, I stumbled upon Dismuke's Live365 station and was instantly hooked. Thank you Dismuke!

I'd also agree with Ian about the influence cartoons must have had, after buying a Tom & Jerry DVD last weekend (ah, nostalgia wink.gif ) it struck me that the music I thought I'd only just discovered was what I'd heard and enjoyed, subconciously perhaps, throughout my childhood.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jarred
post Jul 20 2004, 01:00 AM
Post #4


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 150
Joined: 1-June 03
Member No.: 14



Yes, cartoons introduced me to the music I love too.
When I was very young, I would watch those cartoons over and over and over and over and over and...Oh well, you get the point. Over time, I developed a curiosity for the music in those old Looney Tunes shorts. One cartoon, however, seemed to have more impact than all the rest. It was called "Book Revue", which I later learned came out about 1946. It had cartoon versions of Benny Goodman, Gene Krupa, Harry James, and Tommy Dorsey in it, playing "It Had To Be You". This six minute clip may have influenced the entire rest of my life. When I was about 11, I discovered an internet radio station, and by randomly finding a Benny Goodman track playing (it was "Limehouse Blues", I was instantly hooked, with my interest growing gradually from then on. Since 1999, my knowledge of 20s, 30s, and 40s music has doubled, tripled, and quadrupled a thousand times over. My brain is packed tightly with loads of seemingly useless (to most people) information. I love it, and I regret nothing. Yet I had an emotional experience last year when I went back and looked at that Looney Tunes tape again, discovering I now knew who those people were. It really did make me cry to see just how far I came from this little childhood experience.
Also, I might mention, that I had virtually no knowledge of this music passed down from anyone in my family before my interest started (I owe it all to Carl Stalling), although I did live in a town for a few years that Glenn Miller grew up in, which could have spurred something, although I really don't find his particular music that interesting any more, other than the early stuff.
Well, I hope you enjoyed my story. Hopefully more will follow.

By the way, do any of you know where I might be able to find a tape of some of those 30s cartoons with Cab Calloway in them? I have never seen them and am very curious. I'm a big fan of him too.



Also, as a bonus I'd like to share some of the songs I remember from the old cartoons that I have discovered in the past 5 years:

"Powerhouse"-Raymond Scott, 1937
"The Lady In Red"-Xavier Cugat-1935
"Coffee, A Sandwich, And You"-1925
"You Oughta Be In Pictures"-1934
"Someone's Rocking My Dreamboat"-Benny Goodman-1941
"Carolina In The Morning"-1922
"Dinner Music For A Pack Of Hungry Cannibals"-Raymond Scott-1937
"The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down"-1937


--------------------
You can't handle the truthiness!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Eddie
post Jul 20 2004, 09:30 PM
Post #5


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 16-July 04
Member No.: 174



QUOTE
By the way, do any of you know where I might be able to find a tape of some of those 30s cartoons with Cab Calloway in them? I have never seen them and am very curious. I'm a big fan of him too.


There seem to be a few cartoon collections being released on DVD at the moment, they might be available eventually. Google tells me that the 3 Fleischer productions he featured in were Minnie the Moocher, Snow White and Old Man of the Mountain, all Betty Boop toons.
If your ISP has a good usenet service, you could try keeping an eye on alt.binaries.multimedia.cartoons.vintage , or making a request there if you can't find anything, or can't find anyhting in the right DVD region coding or VC format.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Eddie
post Jul 30 2004, 03:46 PM
Post #6


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 16-July 04
Member No.: 174



Update: The three Betty Boop/Calloway cartoons have appeared at alt.binaries.multimedia.cartoons.vintage today, along with a BB/Louis Armstrong toon. They've been posted as yEncoded rar's with par2 blocks, and look to be about 100-150 megs or so each.

edit: Added screencaps.

Cab dancing at start of toon.


Walrus sings "Minnie the Moocher"

The file I've got seems to have been taken directly from DVD, so I guess they must be on sale somewhere.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Calmius
post Aug 4 2004, 07:15 PM
Post #7


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3
Joined: 4-June 04
Member No.: 162



My story is very weird.

I got into the old music after I've seen a horror movie The Shining. It featured 2 or 3 Ray Noble and Al Bowlly songs and I really liked them. I downloaded some, and got hooked.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ian House
post Aug 13 2004, 07:09 AM
Post #8


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 1190
Joined: 30-November 03
Member No.: 85



Jarred/Eddie,

Sorry for the late response. I just noticed your posts...

The three Betty Boop/Cab Calloway cartoons are indeed available on DVD. Here's the info:

It's one of those cheap, bargain DVDs called simply, "Betty Boop -23 classic cartoons" (a white box with yellow lettering -2 dvds) Despite the cheap appearance, I must say that the video and sound transfers are quite excellent. It's distributed by a company called Platinum Disc Corporation (P.O Box 2798, La Crosse, WI 54602) That's all the info I can see.

I'll go back to my local store and see if I can still find a few copies for sale in case you guys can't find it. (although, I remember picking up the only copy they had that was in a bargain bin)

For my money, the best of the three cartoons is "The Old Man of the Mountain" I've seen it about 18 thousand times and still never get tired of it.


_ _ _

CD must haves:

The Carl Stalling Project (Volume 1) CD26027
The Carl Stalling Project (Volume 2) 9 45430-2
available at Amazon.com

The Raymond Scott Project STASH ST-CD-543

The Chronogical (sp?) Cab Calloway and his Orchestra CLASSICS label
This is a series of 13 cds. Every studio recording from 1930-1955




regards,

Ian


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
gregoryagogo
post Aug 13 2004, 06:38 PM
Post #9


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 1363
Joined: 14-August 03
From: San Diego, California
Member No.: 50



Being a product of the 1970's, I always felt out of place with that crap (Rock, disco) (I since can see the "swing" in disco and can appreciate it now). I used to lock myself in my room where it was safe to be different and play my kiddie records over and over again. Then in High school I joined other nerds in the band.

Every once in a while I would hear an older version of the swing songs I was collecting from thrift store runs of 78's I was collecting. My experience has been a journey backwards, appreciateing the roots of the music I loved. Our country was expanding so fast, people say Elvis and Rock-n-roll changed music forever... yes that's not completely true. Things were steadily evolving right up until that point! I think music in general can be traced back to the music we love.

I think it's fasinating to hear the gradual evolution to that "1920's syncopated cartoon style" type of jazz to the "war time swing style" then finally to that "Frank Sinatra 1950's Swing"


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jarred
post Aug 14 2004, 09:55 PM
Post #10


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 150
Joined: 1-June 03
Member No.: 14



Already got all the 13 Cab CDs and I love 'em all! I also have the "Reckless Nights And Turkish Twilights" CD by Raymond Scott and collect records by him that weren't on that one. It's a shame they didn't have "The Girl With The Light Blue Hair", but a found a download of it!


--------------------
You can't handle the truthiness!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
webwide
post Aug 23 2004, 03:26 PM
Post #11


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 23-August 04
Member No.: 180



Interesting topic. I suspect subliminal influence from cartoons as well. However, as far as conscious choices go I guess it started with being open to music of all types from day one. Some would call this 'eclectic.'

The earliest recorded tune I can remember is Petula Clark's "Downtown" playing on the car radio as we literally drove around downtown Fort Worth waiting for my Dad to get off from work. I lived in remote West Texas from 4-12 and spent many a night tuning up and down the AM dial to pick up radio stations out of New Orleans or Oklahoma City so I could hear rock. In 1973 we moved to Lake Worth and I was like a kid in a candy store with all the musical selections. I listened mostly to rock but spent quite a bit of time on K104, the Black Rocker. I was probably the only 13-year-old white kid in Texas singing along to the Isley Brothers' "Who's That Lady."

I also went through a jazz phase when I ran across a station playing Michael Franks' "Eggplant" and just kept listening.

But Big Band and such never appealed to me, even though I had been in band myself. Then one fateful day in my late 30's my wife and I started taking ballroom dance classes. It must have been a mid-life crisis. We went over to Dallas with a friend of her's and learned some sort of six-step push/swing move and that was OK, but then we went with her friend to a little club on Northwest Highway called the Sand Castle. I was immediately transported back in time to something off of a Casa Blanca set. We drank martinis, we talked to a blackjack dealer who used to work for Sam Giancana in Vegas and we watched teenagers and 20-something's dance with more style and sexiness and energy than I thought possible. The music was swing, and not all retro stuff either. Lots of original classics and almost all of it was stuff I'd never heard before. We were both hooked. We spent almost every weekend there until it closed down a year later and have been swingin' ever since. When we watched Ken Burns' excellent work on Jazz I sat up straight on the couch the minute I heard the first straight jazz beat shift over to a shuffle beat and become swing. Sonofagun, it was Biederbecke! A white guy! laugh.gif

I could go on and on, but I'll save some for other posts.

Glenn
glenn@thedixons.net
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
WhitemansWhisper...
post Aug 25 2004, 05:26 AM
Post #12


Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 21
Joined: 10-July 04
Member No.: 173



Yes, this is an interesting topic. My interest in the music from the 1920s and 1930s has been a very gradual development. As a teenager of the 1970s I did listen to the pop, rock and disco of the time, but then one day I heard Glenn Miller's "In the Mood" and liked it immediately because of all the "false" endings and its very happy and upbeat sound.

As the 80s drew to a close, I discovered a radio station called CKUA and a programme called "Play It Again", which played popular music between the 1920s and mid 1950's My musical interests as a consequence expanded beyond what was current, and the pre-rock years really came alive to me. It wasn't much later that I discovered the two other programmes, called "The Long Weekend" and "The Old Disc-Jockey". In 1994, I bought my first CD, a Glenn Miller one, of course.

Since then, I have become a huge fan of other musicians from that earlier time. As with many of you here, I too enjoy Cab Calloway. Oh how he could entertain! And what fun he had with the English language! Have you heard his song "Everybody Eats When They Come To My House"? So creative how he rhymes the person's name with the name of the food.

Also absolutely adore Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald. They were magical apart and together. If their movies ever came out on DVD, I'd be thrilled. Here's hoping this will happen in the near future.

And then there is Gracie Fields. I have a CD of some of her hits from 1928-1947. She was more known for her comedic songs like her famous "The Biggest Aspidistra In The World" and she would deliberately make her voice rather squeaky when she was being funny but she sang so beautifully when she became serious.

I'm really into the recordings of Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra now. There is just something about the sound of his orchestra that I really do like. August 1920 turned out to be a very significant and important month in his career as he recorded Avalon, Wang-Wang Blues, The Japanese Sandman, and of course, my favourite, Whispering. The last two songs became big hits for Whiteman and made him very popular and successful in the 20s.

Now of course with the advent of the internet, I can and I do listen to "The Big Broadcast" every Sunday and greatly look forward to it. Loved the show on Louis Armstrong.

Well, that is my story. Guess I've rambled on long enough. Who are your favourites from the 20s and 30s?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ian House
post Aug 26 2004, 02:31 AM
Post #13


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 1190
Joined: 30-November 03
Member No.: 85



Hey WW,

Yes, "Everybody Eats When They Come To My House" is such a joyous and creative song (...but then I say that about all of Cab's stuff!) How can you NOT smile when you hear it. "Eat the tables, the chairs, the napkins, who cares?...You gotta eat if it chokes ya!"

For anybody who hasn't heard the song, click here to listen.

_ _ _

favorites: ( I have dozens of favorite artists from the 20s/30s but these are the ones I would take to a desert island.) Cab Calloway, Lee Morse, Rudy Vallee, Annette Hanshaw, Ruth Etting, Paul Whiteman, Jack Smith, Cliff Edwards, Ted Lewis ... and everybody else!

_ _ _


Hey Jarred,

Did you ever get a hold of those Betty Boop dvds? I went to the store where I picked up my copy, but they didn't have any available... But, I also checked on Amazon and saw that it was available there. (go to Amazon.com, search the dvds for "Betty Boop", click on the 7th entry simply labelled "Betty Boop") I'd try and link to it for you but links to Amazon's website listings never seem to work for me. Doublecheck the list to make sure that the three Cab cartoons mentioned earlier are on the dvd(s).


regards,

Ian


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
franz_ghf
post Sep 28 2004, 07:49 PM
Post #14


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 6-September 04
From: Germany / Bavaria / 95180 Berg
Member No.: 184



Hello,

i am Franz from Bavaria/Germany.
Born 1961 i came to this kind of music by listening Radio in the late sixties and early seventies. That time we had no TV and the radio in the kitchen was playing all the time. Each wednesday at 7.15pm there was a radio-show named "Bunter Teller" on "Bayerischer Rundfunk BR1" , I heared that musik the first time and I enjoyed it.
Some years later the man who played that musik retired and had this show only a few times a year any more ( January 1st, January 6th, Easter, Christmas and 2 or 3 other days a year ). Up from this time i tried to record all of his shows - i got a tape-recorder that time - and recorded a lot of tapes full of this music and information about it. In the early eighties "Jimmy Jungermann" died and his show died too. I heared my tapes and searched and collected records (78er, Vinyl and CD ) but found no radio-station which had this music in program.

Now in september 2004 i got fast internet connection with flatrate and searched in the net and found "Dismuke".

Now almost each evening not the radio is playing but the computer ... and I am happy ... ive got my music back.

Thank you Dismuke

Franz
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jmark2001
post Sep 29 2004, 02:41 PM
Post #15


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 5
Joined: 7-June 04
Member No.: 164



I fell in love with this music from watching old movies, hearing the Beatles do a few of their faux thirties songs, (When I'm sixty four, Honey pie, Good night), the sixties hit, "Winchester Cathedral," and being a big fan of old time radio ( I have over ten thousand radio shows on mp3). I LOVE hot Jazz bands, fast tempo foxtrots, etc. Does anyone know who sings the song, "Do you believe me?" The lyrics are:

Do you believe me when I say I love you?
Do you believe me when I say I care?
Do you believe me when I say I'm hoping, all my gladness and my sadness you will share?
The guy singing has such a sincere voice without being a good singer. If anyone knows, please inform me who this is.

This music makes me happy.
Ken
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 19th February 2019 - 03:59 AM