IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 Forum Rules 
> I've Got Those Plastic Blues, I pine for wood, porcelin and marble...
Ian House
post Apr 10 2007, 01:04 AM
Post #1


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 1190
Joined: 30-November 03
Member No.: 85



I can't think of anything that offends my aesthetic sensibilities more than PLASTIC... Is this it? Are we forever sentenced to live with this stuff until the end of time? Will we EVER return to an age of high refinement and elegance? Just because something can be manufactured by using plastics, must it be? It just never stops. To me, when it comes to manufacturing, using plastic is like "phoning it in" - it's cheap, easy and disposable. It's function without form. (OK, plastic plumbing pipes make sense to me ... but that's it!)

_ _ _

I'm writing about this because I've just returned home from a trip to the market. Along my route, there is a vacant lot where they have been constructing a new church. Today, laying on the ground awaiting to be lifted into place, I saw a prefabricated PLASTIC steeple (fully formed with glorious -ahem- modern architectural detailing) It's a cheap joke -but- Is nothing sacred? It has as much appeal as a Burger King sign -actually, LESS! ... I can't wait to see how beautiful the stained-plastic windows will be.

I recently purchased a new home (which I highly doubt will survive a 19th Century brownstone in Manhattan) ... and I was depressed to learn that the highest grade bathtub offered by the contractor was made out of plastic. So much for the porcelain bubble baths of my lost youth.

True, plastic was invented in 1862 and enjoyed a steady period of experimentation and development throughout the 20th Century (remember Bakelite?) but we are currently reaping the FULL rewards of this chemical miracle child here in the 21st Century. And, it seems, it will only get "better" in the years to come :-( Soon, we will be driving the stuff, wearing the stuff, reading the stuff ... and maybe even eating the stuff as well ...?

This rant has been shrink-wrapped for your convenience.





.

This post has been edited by Ian House: Apr 10 2007, 03:22 AM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
 
Start new topic
Replies
Flapper Girl
post Apr 13 2007, 12:21 AM
Post #2


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 296
Joined: 22-July 03
From: New England
Member No.: 38



Now, let me see..... What did folks use before plastic commodes came upon the scene? Oh, now I remember..... Good old fashioned chamberpots. Made of porcelain, they were wondrous things to behold, especially at 2 or 3 AM on a cold, wintry night. Sure beat the alternative of making the trek outside to the little house with the half moon on the door.

Flap
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Roseman
post Apr 13 2007, 01:34 AM
Post #3


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 877
Joined: 1-July 06
Member No.: 473



QUOTE(Flapper Girl @ Apr 12 2007, 06:21 PM) *
Now, let me see..... What did folks use before plastic commodes came upon the scene? Oh, now I remember..... Good old fashioned chamberpots. Made of porcelain, they were wondrous things to behold, especially at 2 or 3 AM on a cold, wintry night. Sure beat the alternative of making the trek outside to the little house with the half moon on the door.

Flap


Ah yes, I remember those days and lived them too. I was almost a teenager before my parents put in indoor plumbing. There were five of us in a two bedroom house. Momma and Daddy had one bedroom and three of us boys sleep in the other bedroom. We slept three to a bed; and being the youngest, I got to sleep in the middle with the big brothers mashing and poking me all night.

Momma cooked on an old wood stove and one of my chores was to make sure the kindling box was always full. I failed once in this responsiblilty and remember my daddy rolling me out of bed early one morning and sent me out in the dark, cold winter morning to prepare a whole box of fresh kindling. I don't remember ever failing to uphold that chore again.

Wood stoves were great in the winter, an extra source for heat, but boy in these southern summers, it was terrible. Cook, eat, and get out of the house, and hoped things cooled down by bedtime.

Ah, the good old days...???

Don...




This post has been edited by Roseman: Apr 13 2007, 01:36 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dismuke
post Apr 13 2007, 09:01 AM
Post #4


Administrator
***

Group: Admin
Posts: 587
Joined: 21-May 03
Member No.: 1



QUOTE(Roseman @ Apr 12 2007, 08:34 PM) *
Wood stoves were great in the winter, an extra source for heat, but boy in these southern summers, it was terrible. Cook, eat, and get out of the house, and hoped things cooled down by bedtime.



One thing I have always wondered is why people back then either did not have an outdoors type of stove for the summer months or else move the existing stove outdoors to some sort of covered but open air shelter that would protect the stove from rain. The last thing I would want to do in a house with no air conditioning is operate a wood stove in the summer indoors.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
matto
post Apr 14 2007, 03:37 PM
Post #5


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 391
Joined: 3-November 05
From: North Central Texas (DFW)
Member No.: 340



QUOTE(dismuke @ Apr 13 2007, 04:01 AM) *
One thing I have always wondered is why people back then either did not have an outdoors type of stove for the summer months or else move the existing stove outdoors to some sort of covered but open air shelter that would protect the stove from rain. The last thing I would want to do in a house with no air conditioning is operate a wood stove in the summer indoors.



My Grandmother, who is almost 92, remembers having a "summer kitchen" on the back porch of their house. They had a separate cooking stove out there so that they could cook without heating up the house. This was the "new" house build in 1918 when my grandmother was 2. It was a novelty because of that summer kitchen and electricity.

They still had and outhouse and heated the house with coal until 1931, when the summer kitchen was enclosed and turned into a 4th bedroom and indoor bathroom. They also installed gas in the house for cooking. I still remember the 1930's gas cooking stove sitting out in the barn.

One thing to note about the house is that the interior was VERY Edwardian in style except for the bedroom and bathroom addition, which had many Art Deco elements.

When I was a child in the 1980's and my Great Grandmother passed away, I remember going into that house many times. It was a big old type of house with a foyer and all.....including a giant brass gated coal heating stove in the dining room, which was in disuse for years, but still remained. All the closets were lined with cedar, so the smell of cedar was very strong thoughout the house. My great grandmother kept the house in an old fashioned German style. I remember old furnature everywhere, and even old 20's era hats and coats in the coat closet. There was a Victor electrola in the living room and stained glass light fixtures. The house was a literal time capsule...albiet a bit worn. At that time no one had lived in the house for awhile and the wall paper was peeling down and there were bats in the chimney. My grandmother, however, kept all of the woodwork highly polished. The house extruded elements of both grandeur and decay. What is interesting is that my great-grandparents never gave in to "modern" culture. The house, as I remember, had not one element past the 1940's in it.
My great-grandparents ran a hardware and housewares store from 1910 to the 1970's. The store was founded by my great-great-grandfather in 1899.

The store closed in 1979 before I was born. It was last run by my great-uncle.
When my parents married in 1977, my Father toured the store and remembers that it was also frozen in time. It had a tin pressed ceiling, ancient ceiling fans, skylights, glass and wood counters, and shelving around the peremeter. The high shelving was accessed with giant ladders. My Dad says that it looked exactly like a 1915 picture my Grandmother has.

Unfortunately both the house and store were sold for financial reasons. The store was GUTTED and turned into an addition for the First National Bank. It now has a tacky 1980's decor with an acoustic tile cieling, gold fans, mustard yellow carpeting, cheap wood paneling, and an UGLY composite stone new front OVER the brick. All of the display cases and shelving were sold. Ironically, my great uncle still works in the same building, as a bank book-keeper at age 86. The house was sold in the 1990's after being vacant for many years. The new owners were relatives and restored the house well, although they did put in some modern tacky elements. Needless to say, it is no longer a time capsule.

This post has been edited by matto: Apr 14 2007, 04:17 PM


--------------------
Matt "The Ol' 78 Maestro" from College Station.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Posts in this topic
- Ian House   I've Got Those Plastic Blues   Apr 10 2007, 01:04 AM
- - Gart   Ian, Rant or not, you always have something inter...   Apr 10 2007, 03:04 AM
|- - Ian House   QUOTE(Gart @ Apr 9 2007, 09:04 PM) Wasn...   Apr 10 2007, 03:17 AM
- - victrolajazz   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 07:04 PM) S...   Apr 10 2007, 04:01 AM
|- - Ian House   QUOTE(victrolajazz @ Apr 9 2007, 10:01 PM...   Apr 10 2007, 04:12 AM
|- - victrolajazz   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 10:12 PM) A...   Apr 10 2007, 04:20 AM
|- - Ian House   QUOTE(victrolajazz @ Apr 9 2007, 10:20 PM...   Apr 10 2007, 04:34 AM
|- - victrolajazz   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 10:34 PM) T...   Apr 10 2007, 04:40 AM
|- - Ian House   QUOTE(victrolajazz @ Apr 9 2007, 10:40 PM...   Apr 10 2007, 04:58 AM
|- - Flapper Girl   Wow! Does it get any better than this? Tha...   Apr 10 2007, 02:25 PM
|- - victrolajazz   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 11:58 PM) E...   Apr 10 2007, 03:43 PM
- - Ian House   Well, we'll know the answer in: 66 days, 13 h...   Apr 10 2007, 04:56 AM
|- - laughland   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 11:56 PM) W...   Apr 10 2007, 05:37 PM
- - Flapper Girl   Oh, for the days when cars came with shiny, chrome...   Apr 10 2007, 10:12 PM
- - Roseman   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 07:04 PM) I...   Apr 11 2007, 02:35 AM
|- - Ian House   QUOTE(Roseman @ Apr 10 2007, 08:35 PM) On...   Apr 11 2007, 03:14 AM
- - dismuke   I used to feel the same way Ian does about plastic...   Apr 11 2007, 07:19 AM
|- - Victor C. Brunswick   QUOTE(dismuke @ Apr 11 2007, 02:19 AM) On...   Apr 12 2007, 08:11 AM
- - Andy Senior   My black PLASTIC 1927 Parker Duofold Jr. fountain ...   Apr 12 2007, 12:16 AM
|- - Ian House   QUOTE(Andy Senior @ Apr 11 2007, 06:16 PM...   Apr 12 2007, 03:37 AM
|- - victrolajazz   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 11 2007, 10:37 PM) ...   Apr 12 2007, 03:50 PM
|- - Ian House   QUOTE(victrolajazz @ Apr 12 2007, 09:50 A...   Apr 12 2007, 05:01 PM
- - Andy Senior   Ian, The same exact thing happened to our compute...   Apr 12 2007, 04:43 AM
- - Ian House   Oh Andy, I'm SO sorry to hear that you were a...   Apr 12 2007, 05:10 AM
- - Andy Senior   QUOTEI bought them before the fad to repurpose the...   Apr 12 2007, 07:26 AM
- - Flapper Girl   When New Hampshire’s grand Old Man of the Mountain...   Apr 12 2007, 02:10 PM
|- - Ian House   QUOTE(Flapper Girl @ Apr 12 2007, 08:10 A...   Apr 12 2007, 04:44 PM
- - Victor C. Brunswick   A while back I was at either a Target store or Kma...   Apr 12 2007, 06:46 PM
|- - victrolajazz   QUOTE(Victor C. Brunswick @ Apr 12 2007, 01...   Apr 12 2007, 07:38 PM
- - Flapper Girl   I have several pieces of Depression glass, as well...   Apr 12 2007, 08:15 PM
|- - Ian House   QUOTE(Flapper Girl @ Apr 12 2007, 02:15 P...   Apr 12 2007, 08:35 PM
- - Ian House   Contemporary Glass: .   Apr 12 2007, 08:47 PM
- - Roseman   O.K. Gang, This plastic thread needs a little att...   Apr 12 2007, 09:29 PM
- - Ian House   Plastic Lumber? I suppose that's no longer con...   Apr 12 2007, 09:40 PM
- - Flapper Girl   Now, let me see..... What did folks use before pla...   Apr 13 2007, 12:21 AM
|- - Roseman   QUOTE(Flapper Girl @ Apr 12 2007, 06:21 P...   Apr 13 2007, 01:34 AM
|- - dismuke   QUOTE(Roseman @ Apr 12 2007, 08:34 PM) Wo...   Apr 13 2007, 09:01 AM
|- - Roseman   QUOTE(laughland @ Apr 12 2007, 10:04 PM) ...   Apr 13 2007, 10:30 AM
|- - matto   QUOTE(dismuke @ Apr 13 2007, 04:01 AM) On...   Apr 14 2007, 03:37 PM
- - Ian House   Don, Thanks for sharing those childhood memories....   Apr 13 2007, 01:47 AM
|- - Roseman   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 12 2007, 07:47 PM) ...   Apr 13 2007, 02:22 AM
|- - Roseman   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 12 2007, 07:47 PM) ...   Apr 13 2007, 03:09 AM
- - Ian House   How wonderful to have such a vivid memory of that ...   Apr 13 2007, 03:04 AM
|- - laughland   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 12 2007, 10:04 PM) ...   Apr 13 2007, 04:04 AM
- - Flapper Girl   The porcelain chamberpots were usually decorated w...   Apr 13 2007, 03:01 PM
- - Ian House   Hi Matt, Your post is wonderfully redolent of ced...   Apr 14 2007, 04:10 PM
|- - matto   QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 14 2007, 11:10 AM) ...   Apr 14 2007, 04:15 PM
- - Victor C. Brunswick   What I find to be a real eyesore out here are thes...   Apr 14 2007, 06:47 PM
|- - Ian House   QUOTE(Victor C. Brunswick @ Apr 14 2007, 12...   Apr 14 2007, 08:11 PM
|- - victrolajazz   QUOTE(Victor C. Brunswick @ Apr 14 2007, 01...   Apr 14 2007, 08:51 PM
|- - dismuke   QUOTE(Victor C. Brunswick @ Apr 14 2007, 01...   Apr 15 2007, 06:24 PM
- - Roseman   Not having a specific forum to put this post into,...   Apr 16 2007, 03:43 AM
|- - dismuke   QUOTE(Roseman @ Apr 15 2007, 10:43 PM) He...   Apr 17 2007, 01:43 AM
- - Roseman   Here's one we missed discussing when this thre...   Jul 10 2007, 12:37 AM


Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 14th December 2019 - 10:05 PM