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> Jewish Elements in 20's/30's Music, How the Jewish Culture influend 20's
Ed Vasicek
post May 13 2006, 03:32 AM
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biggrin.gif Several threads have mentioned Ted Lewis. Ted Lewis played his clarinet a certain style, called, "Gaspipe." It is an overblown clarinet style, reminiscient of Middle Eastern music. As a matter of fact, if you listen to a lot of Jewish celebration music, called Klezmer Music, they often use this method.

If you follow this link to an Amazon.com CD with samples, you can hear this style in a Jewish context.
www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000002U0/sr=8-1/qid=1147490660/ref=sr_1_1/104-2762814-7946340?%5Fencoding=UTF8

I am not Jewish myself, but I have a special interest in the Jewish culture for theological reaons (and have good friends who participate in a Messianic Jewish congregation) and I just think it is cool. But I believe Ted Lewis was Jewish. I am not sure which came first: Klezmer music with the overblown clarinet or popular jazz with the overblown clarinet; my guess is the former.

Of course Al Jolson's father was a Rabbi, and Jolson definitely incorporated the Jewish style into his songs. Many, many of the great comedians and popular singers/entertainers were Jewish and set the tone for much of our music and later music (Fanny Brice, Eddie Cantor, Jolson, Danny Kaye, Dinah Shore, to name just a few). cool.gif
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Ed Vasicek
post May 13 2006, 03:58 AM
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blink.gif You know I am odd when I reply to my own posts!

I thought I should add a bit more. The great songwriters of the era were often Jewish. I am talking about the big guns, like Irving Berlin (who made a fortune empahsizing the secular aspects of Christmas ["White Christmas"] and Easter [Easter Parade]). George and Ira Gershwin, and Jerome Kern, to name a few.

And comedians? Jack Benny, Fred Allen, The Three Stooges, The Marx Brothers...Jerry Lewis...and on and on.

In some ways, the popular Jazz of the 20's and early 30's had strong elements of both the African-American and Jewish cultures.
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victrolajazz
post May 13 2006, 04:03 PM
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I've noticed that, too--here are a few more whom I believe are Jewish: Ben Bernie, Ben Selvin, Isham Jones, Bennie Krueger, Fanny Brice, Herman Farberman (the trumpet player on most of the Krueger acousticals), Benny Goodman, Gus Kahn, Roger Wolfe Kahn (son on multi-millionaire patron of the arts Otto Kahn), Abe Lyman.

Eddie the Collector
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gregoryagogo
post May 13 2006, 05:42 PM
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I think we are all a little bit Jewish! ...And a little bit Irish, and a little bit African American, a little bit everything. Our wonderful American Culture lets us be anything we want. I feel that I'm a little of everhthing!

You can always tie people together by music and food!

Love,
Gregory rolleyes.gif


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Fredrik
post May 14 2006, 12:59 PM
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Many of the musicians, singers and composers above were indeed jewish. I some cases this becomes even more evident if you know their real names: Ted Lewis was for example born Theodore Friedman and Ben Bernie's actual name was Bernhard Anselwitz (not sure about the spelling though). But I've never heard or read anything about Isham Jones being of jewish heritage; where does that information come from? I know he was from a mining district in Ohio, which doesn't seem like a typical settlement for jewish immigrants.

Another name that could be added to the list above is prolific vocalist Irving kaufman (and his brother Jack).

Fredrik
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Ian House
post May 14 2006, 04:59 PM
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Please don't forget to add Arthur Arshawsky (Artie Shaw), Harry Warnow (Raymond Scott), Melvin Jerome Blanc (Mel Blanc) and Isadore Freleng (Friz Freleng) to the list...

_ _ _

Here's an interesting link from Dismuke:

The Yiddish-American Digital Archives


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tferbe
post May 15 2006, 03:20 AM
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I have mentioned before that my mom was a caberet singer in New York for most of her life and on the lower east side Jewish (Yidish) music was the most common. If my Mom's rendition of My Yiddisha Momma didn't bring a tear to your eye, you weren't human no matter what your ethnic or religious background might be. Tsena, Tsena and Roumania were also among her most popular songs. But she could also belt out an Italian or Irish or French tune if you tipped her properly and certainly nearly any tune from the 1910s to the 1950s. It was a great way to grow up even if it meant missing some schooldays because of the late hours.
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Ian House
post May 15 2006, 03:24 AM
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QUOTE(tferbe @ May 14 2006, 09:20 PM)
and on the lower east side Jewish (Yidish) music was the most common.

Hey Ted,

Did you grow up in that neighborhood?


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tferbe
post May 15 2006, 11:34 PM
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Born 1946 Williamsburg, Brooklyn, grew up in Bensonhurst, living in Sheepshead Bay. Guess that qualifies me as a Brooklynite. Manhatten is only a place to visit once in a while. biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif
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Jarred
post May 16 2006, 11:47 PM
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Ziggy Elman (r.n. Harry Finkelman), trumpet player with Goodman and T. Dorsey, had his own band in the late 1940s. "And The Angels Sing". This and many other songs he recorded have him playing in that "Klezmer/Fralich" style. It seemed quite commercially successful for a while then, and he used it to its advantage.


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Edisone
post May 23 2006, 01:52 AM
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Isham Jones is a Welsh name ... and Fred Allen was 100% Irish (and Catholic)
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80rpm
post May 27 2006, 04:13 PM
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Jewish influences show up where you don't expect them. You could not be more gentile than Cole Porter yet he often used Jewish harmonic modes. With this in mind, listen to "My Heart Belongs To Daddy" with it's minor key sections with raised sevenths.
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