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> I've Got Those Plastic Blues, I pine for wood, porcelin and marble...
Ian House
post Apr 10 2007, 01:04 AM
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I can't think of anything that offends my aesthetic sensibilities more than PLASTIC... Is this it? Are we forever sentenced to live with this stuff until the end of time? Will we EVER return to an age of high refinement and elegance? Just because something can be manufactured by using plastics, must it be? It just never stops. To me, when it comes to manufacturing, using plastic is like "phoning it in" - it's cheap, easy and disposable. It's function without form. (OK, plastic plumbing pipes make sense to me ... but that's it!)

_ _ _

I'm writing about this because I've just returned home from a trip to the market. Along my route, there is a vacant lot where they have been constructing a new church. Today, laying on the ground awaiting to be lifted into place, I saw a prefabricated PLASTIC steeple (fully formed with glorious -ahem- modern architectural detailing) It's a cheap joke -but- Is nothing sacred? It has as much appeal as a Burger King sign -actually, LESS! ... I can't wait to see how beautiful the stained-plastic windows will be.

I recently purchased a new home (which I highly doubt will survive a 19th Century brownstone in Manhattan) ... and I was depressed to learn that the highest grade bathtub offered by the contractor was made out of plastic. So much for the porcelain bubble baths of my lost youth.

True, plastic was invented in 1862 and enjoyed a steady period of experimentation and development throughout the 20th Century (remember Bakelite?) but we are currently reaping the FULL rewards of this chemical miracle child here in the 21st Century. And, it seems, it will only get "better" in the years to come :-( Soon, we will be driving the stuff, wearing the stuff, reading the stuff ... and maybe even eating the stuff as well ...?

This rant has been shrink-wrapped for your convenience.





.

This post has been edited by Ian House: Apr 10 2007, 03:22 AM


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Gart
post Apr 10 2007, 03:04 AM
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Ian,

Rant or not, you always have something interesting, enjoyable -- usually both -- to impart. Keep 'em coming!

Wasn't 'plastic' the wave of the future as confided to Dustin Hoffman in "The Graduate"?

Gart
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Ian House
post Apr 10 2007, 03:17 AM
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QUOTE(Gart @ Apr 9 2007, 09:04 PM) *
Wasn't 'plastic' the wave of the future as confided to Dustin Hoffman in "The Graduate"?

Gart



Yes Gart, that was the future offered to Hoffman in 1967 -and the future is NOW!. It is often stated that children are the future of our country. It saddens me to think that even our young women are now made up of about 5% plastic insulted by what nature has provided for them...

Thanks for allowing me to vent, I feel better! (seeing that pseudo-steeple sitting on the ground sent me over the top :-)



-

This post has been edited by Ian House: Apr 10 2007, 03:47 AM


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victrolajazz
post Apr 10 2007, 04:01 AM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 07:04 PM) *
Soon, we will be driving the stuff.

Actually, we've been doing that since at least the 70's. Remember Norma Desmond's comment in Sunset Boulevard: "...cars of today (1950) are made of spit and chrome..." She intended that as an insult--well, at least they HAD chrome! Today she'd have to say "cars are made of spit and plastic".

Eddie the Collector
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Ian House
post Apr 10 2007, 04:12 AM
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QUOTE(victrolajazz @ Apr 9 2007, 10:01 PM) *
Actually, we've been doing that since at least the 70's.


Actually, I think you're right Eddie... And, come to think of it, I think we've been EATING a lot of plastic-like stuff since the 70's as well :-) ... unless you consider aerosol cheese to come from nature...


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victrolajazz
post Apr 10 2007, 04:20 AM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 10:12 PM) *
And, come to think of it, I think we've been EATING a lot of plastic-like stuff since the 70's as well :-) ... unless you consider aerosol cheese to come from nature...

Actually, this is probably true. A friend of mine makes the point that ALL plastics by their very nature are unstable from the moment of manufacture and infintisimal amounts of the stuff can leech into foods stored in containers for long periods. Milk, for instance, would be much better off in glass bottles as it used to be instead of the horrible plastic containers it comes in today.

Another place where the use of plastic backfired was in automobiles in 1940. The new "miracle product" was used lavishly on the dashboards of the upscale cars such as Packards, or the DeLuxe models of Fords, whereas the lowly models had to do with just plain metal. Of course, the upshot was that a couple of decades later, the expensive models' dashes were in slivers while the cheaper cars had perfect dashes!

Eddie the Collector

This post has been edited by victrolajazz: Apr 10 2007, 04:28 AM
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Ian House
post Apr 10 2007, 04:34 AM
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QUOTE(victrolajazz @ Apr 9 2007, 10:20 PM) *
Another place where the use of plastic backfired was in automobiles in 1940. The new "miracle product" was used lavishly on the dashboards of the upscale cars such as Packards, or the DeLuxe models of Fords, whereas the lowly models had to do with just plain metal. Of course, the upshot was that a couple of decades later, the expensive models' dashes were in slivers while the cheaper cars had perfect dashes!

Eddie the Collector


That's FUN! ... You're getting me in the mood for Tulsarama. What do you suspect? Slivers or a perfect dash? :-)


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victrolajazz
post Apr 10 2007, 04:40 AM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 10:34 PM) *
That's FUN! ... You're getting me in the mood for Tulsarama. What do you suspect? Slivers or a perfect dash? :-)

I got to see an ample number of those '57 Chrysler product dashes at 5/10/15 year stages--it ain't gonna be a pretty sight! Actually, the 1940 prinicple would still apply--the buried model, a Belvedere, will have the soft dash, while a cheap Plaza would be all metal!

Eddie the Collector

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Ian House
post Apr 10 2007, 04:56 AM
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Well, we'll know the answer in:

66 days, 13 hours, 7 minutes and 28 seconds!!

Click to watch the YouTube video







.

This post has been edited by Ian House: Apr 10 2007, 08:17 AM


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Ian House
post Apr 10 2007, 04:58 AM
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QUOTE(victrolajazz @ Apr 9 2007, 10:40 PM) *
I got to see an ample number of those '57 Chrysler product dashes at 5/10/15 year stages--it ain't gonna be a pretty sight!

Eddie the Collector



Eddie, isn't it usually sunlight that destroys a vintage dash?


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Flapper Girl
post Apr 10 2007, 02:25 PM
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Wow! Does it get any better than this? That means we have two exhumations to look forward to – that of Houdini and now the ‘57 Plymouth! I understand the decision on Houdini remains with the court and has caused quite a good deal of controversy among his descendants. Will it be a “GO” or not?

Flapper
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victrolajazz
post Apr 10 2007, 03:43 PM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 11:58 PM) *
Eddie, isn't it usually sunlight that destroys a vintage dash?

Sunlight just does it faster. BECAUSE it's plastic, it'll always be in flux, its content changing. I think the top covering will have shrunk and pulled away from the defroster area at the front of the dash, exposing the foam rubber underneath which will have long ago simply dried up and flaked away.

Eddie the Collector
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laughland
post Apr 10 2007, 05:37 PM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 11:56 PM) *
Well, we'll know the answer in:
66 days, 13 hours, 7 minutes and 28 seconds!!
Click to watch the YouTube video


Maybe we'll also see a singing and dancing frog emerge...
"Hello! ma baby, Hello! Ma honey, Hello! ma ragtime gal!"


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Flapper Girl
post Apr 10 2007, 10:12 PM
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Oh, for the days when cars came with shiny, chrome bumpers and withstood the test of time. Those painted plastic jobs are an abomination. You pay big bucks for a new car and within a short time what do you have? Scratches, scratches, scratches and you don’t even know how they got there. Must have brushed up against something somewhere along the way. Real crap!

As for other things, they have already started putting plastic in pet foods. Are we next? Melamine anyone?

Flapper
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Roseman
post Apr 11 2007, 02:35 AM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 9 2007, 07:04 PM) *
I'm writing about this because I've just returned home from a trip to the market.

.


Ian,

I never thought of plastic as a really bad thing. The disposition of it causes some concern and problems, but the benefits far out weigh the problems. If we still had those old heavy cars with all of that weight, what kind of gas bill would we have? I hate to think with prices as they are now. Without plastics, would we have this wonderful invention called the PC? Just a few thoughts.
One other thought; did you use plastic or paper for your purchases at the market? tongue.gif tongue.gif

Don...

This post has been edited by Roseman: Apr 11 2007, 02:59 AM
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