IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 Forum Rules 
 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Hello there & Would any one know about the Sheaffer Parade?, 1940's songbooks &Sheaffer Pen program /sheaffer Parade
Pattie
post Mar 5 2008, 08:35 PM
Post #1


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 5
Joined: 5-March 08
Member No.: 698



I'm trying to find any information about the Sheaffer Parade radio program. I'm researching a relative, Frank Gallagher, who was known as "The singing star of Shaeffer pen program" and earlier of the "Shaeffer Pen program".

One of his songbooks was ,
GUILTY. Gus Kahn, Harry Akst & Richard A. Whiting (w & m).Leo Feist Inc., 7579-2. New York: 1946. 2 pp. Cover text: Featured by Frank Gallagher, singing star of the Sheaffer Pen Program, (with his photograph)

has anyone heard of this program?

Pattie
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Shangas
post Mar 6 2008, 12:21 PM
Post #2


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 263
Joined: 9-November 07
From: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Member No.: 635



Firstly, let's get the spelling right.

It's the Sheaffer Pen Company, not shaeffer, schaffer, sheafur, shcheafer or any other variant (and believe me, I've seen dozens).

If you like, I could ask around. I frequent a fountain pen website with it's own Sheaffer board and I could ask there.

---

Done. Let's see what fishes swim into the net...

This post has been edited by Shangas: Mar 6 2008, 12:24 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Pattie
post Mar 6 2008, 10:09 PM
Post #3


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 5
Joined: 5-March 08
Member No.: 698



QUOTE(Shangas @ Mar 6 2008, 06:21 AM) *
Firstly, let's get the spelling right.

It's the Sheaffer Pen Company, not shaeffer, schaffer, sheafur, shcheafer or any other variant (and believe me, I've seen dozens).

If you like, I could ask around. I frequent a fountain pen website with it's own Sheaffer board and I could ask there.

---

Done. Let's see what fishes swim into the net...


I spelled it right- didn't I?

That would be cool if you ask around for me.
Pattie
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
victrolajazz
post Mar 6 2008, 11:37 PM
Post #4


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 595
Joined: 17-January 06
From: Waco, TX
Member No.: 381



QUOTE(Pattie @ Mar 6 2008, 05:09 PM) *
I spelled it right- didn't I?

That would be cool if you ask around for me.
Pattie


QUOTE(Pattie @ Mar 5 2008, 03:35 PM) *
the Sheaffer Parade radio program.


Yes, you certainly did--and welcome to the board! Hope we see many more posts in the future!

Eddie the Collector
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dismuke
post Mar 7 2008, 01:42 AM
Post #5


Administrator
***

Group: Admin
Posts: 587
Joined: 21-May 03
Member No.: 1



QUOTE(Pattie @ Mar 5 2008, 02:35 PM) *
has anyone heard of this program?

Pattie



No mention of the program in any of the reference books I have on old radio programs.

Do you have an approximate knowledge as to the years he performed? If he was performing in the early 1930s, you might want to spend the $4 to check one of these mentions of someone with the same name in the New York Times radio listings from 1931.

The Big Bands Database says that a singer by that name performed with the Carman Cavallaro Orchestra. Cavallaro did not start a band until 1939 and the 1940s and 1950s was when that band was at its peak. The mention did not say when he was with the Cavallero band. But since the sheet music was from 1946, perhaps it was a program which either featured the Cavallaro band as its main attraction or in which it appeared as a house band. A lot of the comedy programs such as Burns & Allen and Jack Benny, etc. had house bands. And while the formal names of the programs were named after the sponsor, most people referred to the programs by the name of the stars. For example, fans of the Chase & Sanborn Hour usually called it "The Edgar Bergan & Charlie McCarthy Show."

One thing: the song Guilty goes back further to 1931. It was a song that never fully faded away and apparently enjoyed a bit of a revival during the mid 1940s.

I know that this does not answer your question - but perhaps it provides a couple of leads to follow up on.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ian House
post Mar 7 2008, 02:14 AM
Post #6


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 1190
Joined: 30-November 03
Member No.: 85



Welcome to the board Pattie!

I hope you will find this to be a friendly community.


QUOTE(Shangas @ Mar 6 2008, 07:21 AM) *
... with it's own Sheaffer board and I could ask there.


Shangas, be mindful of your grammar! You have incorrectly used the contraction, "it's", instead of the possessive pronoun, "its".



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Pattie
post Mar 7 2008, 02:53 AM
Post #7


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 5
Joined: 5-March 08
Member No.: 698



QUOTE(dismuke @ Mar 6 2008, 07:42 PM) *
No mention of the program in any of the reference books I have on old radio programs.

Do you have an approximate knowledge as to the years he performed? If he was performing in the early 1930s, you might want to spend the $4 to check one of these mentions of someone with the same name in the New York Times radio listings from 1931.

The Big Bands Database says that a singer by that name performed with the Carman Cavallaro Orchestra. Cavallaro did not start a band until 1939 and the 1940s and 1950s was when that band was at its peak. The mention did not say when he was with the Cavallero band. But since the sheet music was from 1946, perhaps it was a program which either featured the Cavallaro band as its main attraction or in which it appeared as a house band. A lot of the comedy programs such as Burns & Allen and Jack Benny, etc. had house bands. And while the formal names of the programs were named after the sponsor, most people referred to the programs by the name of the stars. For example, fans of the Chase & Sanborn Hour usually called it "The Edgar Bergan & Charlie McCarthy Show."

One thing: the song Guilty goes back further to 1931. It was a song that never fully faded away and apparently enjoyed a bit of a revival during the mid 1940s.

I know that this does not answer your question - but perhaps it provides a couple of leads to follow up on.



Thank you,

I wasn't sure I should be on this site.

This is great information and will help me in my research on my grandfather.

The 1946 was 2nd copyright of Frank Gallagher's Guilty. I found one in 1931 as well. I know he was featured on songbook- My Adobe Hacienda and All I want for Christmas.

By the way, my family has a collection of albums and some songbooks, from the early 1900's. I remember one was copyrighted 1903. they are in pretty good shape. We don't know what to do with them. Is there a market for anything this old? I don't know the titles as they have been packed away for a few years.

Pattie

How is my spelling? wink.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Shangas
post Mar 7 2008, 03:47 AM
Post #8


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 263
Joined: 9-November 07
From: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Member No.: 635



QUOTE(Ian House @ Mar 7 2008, 02:14 AM) *
Welcome to the board Pattie!

I hope you will find this to be a friendly community.
Shangas, be mindful of your grammar! You have incorrectly used the contraction, "it's", instead of the possessive pronoun, "its".


My apologies, Ian, but I do try my best sad.gif

I just mentioned that because "Sheaffer" is the most-misspelt pen-brand in the world and people often get frustrated when they can't find information. The main reason is because they can't get the name right. The Sheaffer Pen Company was founded by Walter A. Sheaffer in 1913.

I've received no replies to my inquiries as-yet, but if something pops up, I shall let you know.

---

And if everyone's wondering what I was wailing about, it was this:

"The singing star of "Shaeffer pen program" and earlier of the "Shaeffer Pen program".

I can assure you, you'll find it very hard to obtain information if you type that into a search-engine, because the company name's been misspelt.

This post has been edited by Shangas: Mar 7 2008, 03:53 AM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dismuke
post Mar 7 2008, 05:07 AM
Post #9


Administrator
***

Group: Admin
Posts: 587
Joined: 21-May 03
Member No.: 1



QUOTE(Pattie @ Mar 6 2008, 08:53 PM) *
The 1946 was 2nd copyright of Frank Gallagher's Guilty. I found one in 1931 as well. I know he was featured on songbook- My Adobe Hacienda and All I want for Christmas.


Usually an additional copyright on a song only 15 years after it came out was for the specific arrangement. The composition can have a copyright - and then if someone else comes along and publishes a new arrangement of it, that too can have a copyright. And, of course, back then, a copyright had to be renewed after 28 years.

QUOTE
By the way, my family has a collection of albums and some songbooks, from the early 1900's. I remember one was copyrighted 1903. they are in pretty good shape. We don't know what to do with them. Is there a market for anything this old? I don't know the titles as they have been packed away for a few years.



Was it the record albums or the songbooks that had the 1903 date? If it was an old record issued by an American company, then that would have been the patent date and not the copyright date.

Federal copyrights were not available for sound recordings prior to 1972. The early record companies attempted to protect their content via patents. When you purchased a record, you essentially agreed to terms that you were purchasing a license to use a patented product. Sometimes conditions that sound rather bizarre today were attached to them: you could not resell the record for less than the price marked on the label and, in some cases, you were only allowed to play it on a phonograph made by the record company (though virtually everyone ignored that condition). If you ever do see a copyright notice on a 78 rpm - which was the case with Romeo and some other 1920s labels - the only thing the copyright covers is the label design. Old records can reflect patent dates much older than the issue date of the record. Here is one good source for dating American 78 rpms: http://settlet.fateback.com/

As for whether they have any value - it just depends on what is on the record and whether there is a demand for the particular type of music and artist by collectors. Some vintage records are a dime a dozen. Others are worth a fortune. What sort of records are they - i.e., what are the names of the artists, the record labels and the catalog numbers on the labels?

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Pattie
post Mar 13 2008, 01:31 AM
Post #10


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 5
Joined: 5-March 08
Member No.: 698



AHHH Now I see what you mean. It is not my spelling that needs work, but my pasting skills. blink.gif Must be my spastic finger. Thanks for keeping me on my toes.

Hold on a minute! Is pasting right? pasteing? ...no. paceting?-nope not that. paseting...definitely not. pasting- yup, I got it.

QUOTE(Shangas @ Mar 6 2008, 09:47 PM) *
My apologies, Ian, but I do try my best sad.gif

I just mentioned that because "Sheaffer" is the most-misspelt pen-brand in the world and people often get frustrated when they can't find information. The main reason is because they can't get the name right. The Sheaffer Pen Company was founded by Walter A. Sheaffer in 1913.

I've received no replies to my inquiries as-yet, but if something pops up, I shall let you know.

---

And if everyone's wondering what I was wailing about, it was this:

"The singing star of "Shaeffer pen program" and earlier of the "Shaeffer Pen program".

I can assure you, you'll find it very hard to obtain information if you type that into a search-engine, because the company name's been misspelt.

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Pattie
post Mar 13 2008, 02:30 AM
Post #11


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 5
Joined: 5-March 08
Member No.: 698



Thank you so much.

You really know your stuff! It was the record that said 1903. The records range from early 1900's to 60's. I remember seeing some early Victor and Columbia labels. Some sets. Many 78's but also 33's. There was a mix of orchestral, opera, dance, popular singers, some classical, , and oh....and Hawaiian! I haven't looked at them for years so I don't remember really. I never thought they would be worth much, but I suppose I should take a look before giving them to goodwill . Your info will help! I was given these in 2000 as part of an estate of a 95 yr old woman who played the organ and piano all her life. She had a huge collection of songbooks, mostly 30's, 40's, and 50's, but most went to auction. I have some.

Thanks for the link.


QUOTE(dismuke @ Mar 6 2008, 11:07 PM) *
Usually an additional copyright on a song only 15 years after it came out was for the specific arrangement. The composition can have a copyright - and then if someone else comes along and publishes a new arrangement of it, that too can have a copyright. And, of course, back then, a copyright had to be renewed after 28 years.
Was it the record albums or the songbooks that had the 1903 date? If it was an old record issued by an American company, then that would have been the patent date and not the copyright date.

Federal copyrights were not available for sound recordings prior to 1972. The early record companies attempted to protect their content via patents. When you purchased a record, you essentially agreed to terms that you were purchasing a license to use a patented product. Sometimes conditions that sound rather bizarre today were attached to them: you could not resell the record for less than the price marked on the label and, in some cases, you were only allowed to play it on a phonograph made by the record company (though virtually everyone ignored that condition). If you ever do see a copyright notice on a 78 rpm - which was the case with Romeo and some other 1920s labels - the only thing the copyright covers is the label design. Old records can reflect patent dates much older than the issue date of the record. Here is one good source for dating American 78 rpms: http://settlet.fateback.com/

As for whether they have any value - it just depends on what is on the record and whether there is a demand for the particular type of music and artist by collectors. Some vintage records are a dime a dozen. Others are worth a fortune. What sort of records are they - i.e., what are the names of the artists, the record labels and the catalog numbers on the labels?

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
matto
post Mar 13 2008, 03:50 AM
Post #12


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 391
Joined: 3-November 05
From: North Central Texas (DFW)
Member No.: 340



Goodness,

Don't give 78's to goodwill. They usually trash them these days. I'd either put them up as a all for one lot on ebay or send them to a collector. I'm sure there are plenty of collectors that would give them a good home and even pay for shipping.

Matt


--------------------
Matt "The Ol' 78 Maestro" from College Station.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 24th August 2019 - 06:43 AM