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> World history circa 1900-1945., What I believe to be the most incredible period in history.
Shangas
post Nov 11 2007, 01:55 AM
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So many wonderful things happened in the years 1900-1945. Which are your 'favourites'? Which ones do you love talking about, discussing or writing about?

I'll go for just about anything. When I was a kid, my grandmother and my uncle (Born 1914 & 1935, respectively), used to tell me stories of the Second World War. They both lived in the Malaysia/Singapore region and witnessed the Fall of Singapore in '42.

My uncle's stories, I think, really showed how terrible the Japanese campaign really was. After they'd gone through Malaysia and Singapore, nobody knew anything. Didn't know where their next meal was coming from, where to get clean water, when help was going to come, when to hide, when it was safe to move around. No water, gas, electricity, medical aid, etc.

My uncle's in his early 70s now and a loving grandfather to three beautiful kids. He still lives in Singapore and he's probably telling all those war stories to his grandchildren now... laugh.gif

What are your favourite periods/events in 20th cent. history?


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Ian House
post Nov 11 2007, 03:45 AM
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My favorite aspects of early 20th Century are, in no particular order:

1. The development of mass media, corporate consumerism and mass production. These advancements set the stage for the truly inspired industrial designers like Raymond Loewy and Henry Dreyfuss to express themselves ... as well as countless unknown package and branding designers.

2. The aggressive and enthusiastic competition to build the tallest and finest skyscrapers, from the Woolworth Building to the Empire State Building. Fortunately, this occurred during a period of exquisite taste so most of these buildings are everlasting monuments to the Art Deco age.

3. World's Fair celebrations. Specifically, the 1933 Century of Progress in Chicago and the 1939 New York World's Fair. These exhibitions celebrated the social values of their time: work ethic, industrial might, freedom, aesthetic appreciation, optimism for the future, etc.

4. The development of Jazz music.

5. The development of film animation.

6. The Gibson Girl and the Flapper.

7. Ice cream on a stick.

_ _ _

Many others -these are just off the top!



.

This post has been edited by Ian House: Nov 11 2007, 04:02 AM


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Shangas
post Nov 11 2007, 04:06 AM
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LOL!! Ice-cream on a stick. I think the person who first invented that was a kid in San Francisco. He was having some sort of lemonade drink in the back yard of his house and he left it out overnight with a wooden stirrer inside it. It was midwinter and when he came out the next day, the lemonade had frozen solid. He knocked it out of the glass and, holding his new creation by the wooden stirrer, went right on sucking it. I think the date was 1906.


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Victor C. Brunsw...
post Nov 11 2007, 05:37 AM
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Isn't it interesting that many of the foods we enjoy originated at some world's fair, exposition, etc.? I believe the ice cream cone was invented at the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904 by an ice cream seller who ran out of clean dishes to serve the ice cream on so he borrowed some Belgian waffles from a nearby vender -- or so the story goes.



This post has been edited by Victor C. Brunswick: Nov 11 2007, 05:38 AM
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Shangas
post Nov 11 2007, 05:47 AM
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Yeah I'm not sure if that's true or not, but the story goes that the ice-cream vendor ran out of the paper cups/bowls that he used to serve ice-cream in. So he teamed up with a waffle-maker. The waffle-maker produced the cones and he dumped the ice-cream into it.

Interesting fact - "Malteasers", the little chocolate malt-balls, were advertised during the 1930s as a health-food.



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Ian House
post Nov 11 2007, 07:23 AM
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QUOTE(Shangas @ Nov 11 2007, 12:47 AM) *
Interesting fact - "Malteasers", the little chocolate malt-balls, were advertised during the 1930s as a health-food.


Ha!

Shangas, my Sherlock senses are tingling! I believe that you must hail from England, Ireland, Canada or, perhaps even, Australia ...? Most Americans would not likely be familiar with Maltesers unless they shop at an International specialty shop. The rough equivalent here (and a MUCH inferior product) is known as "Whoppers", little chocolate malt balls that seem to be made out of 50% grade school chalk.

I grew up in Canada and was weaned on Maltesers and other British delights such as Aero bars, Flake bars, Cadbury Crunchie, Maynards wine gums, licorice Allsorts, Taveners fruit drops and the like - none of which are commonly (widely) available to the American consumer :-(


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Ian House
post Nov 11 2007, 07:40 AM
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Oh, I forgot to add Twiglets to my list above! What I wouldn't pay for a large bag of Twiglets right now :-)


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Shangas
post Nov 11 2007, 08:16 AM
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Your deduction is correct, Mr. Holmes. I was born in Sydney, but raised and live in Melbourne, Australia. Hey! Yes, I too grew up on Malteasers. Delicious little chocolate-coated balls of joy... laugh.gif

Malteasers and...Cadbury's Milk Chocolate, with a glass and a half of FULL CREAM MILK to every half-pound of chocolate!! Hahaha!! Oh, god bless Cadbury's...

This post has been edited by Shangas: Nov 11 2007, 08:19 AM


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Ian House
post Nov 11 2007, 09:32 AM
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QUOTE(Shangas @ Nov 11 2007, 03:16 AM) *
I was born in Sydney,


Born in Sydney?

I was born in Marion (and dear Marion was married to Peter :-) ...

_ _ _

Being a pianist, are you familiar with Raie da Costa? She is a recent discovery for some of us courtesy of member, Limden.

Sensational # 1

Sensational # 2



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Shangas
post Nov 11 2007, 09:57 AM
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Yes, Ian, I was born in Sydney. I don't much like it there, to be honest. I mean, it's got some nice things, but I prefer Melbourne. I love it here.

No, I don't know of her! But I THINK I've heard of her name once or twice before. My brain is like...terminally stuck in history. It's almost the only thing I think about at times. Sad, I know. But when I look at history, it amazes me how fast things have progressed. I remember watching this thing on TV several years ago about criminals. Some American guy was sentenced to life in prison for some sort of crime, I can't remember what. Anyway, this was in like, 1915. After about 20 years in jail, the man was sick of prison life, and tried to break out. He had a contact on the outside who promised to have a car parked and waiting in a field near the prison.

The man broke out and made it to the field. In the time that he reached the car, to the time the police recaptured him (Only a few minutes or hours...), he was unable to start the car. Because he didn't know how! laugh.gif When he went to jail in 1915, cars were started manually, by crank. By the 1930s, electric starters in cars were the norm and he had no idea how this new technology worked. He was still trying to figure it out when the boys in blue showed up to cart him off to jail again.


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Flapper Girl
post Nov 11 2007, 01:50 PM
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My father had a 1929 DeSoto, which was equipped with both a new fangled electric starter and a place for a crank. I recall how he used to pull the choke out and then choke her down. In warm weather this always worked with no problem, but when the temperatures dipped to below zero, it was often another story. At such times he would resort to the crank (and a few well chosen words). He was usually able to get the engine to turn over - most of the time anyway.

He held on to that car well into the 1940’s, while most of the employees at the factory where he worked had moved up to more modern transports. One extremely cold evening when workers went to their cars to head home, many vehicles just would not start. Thereupon my father pulled out his trusty crank, turned her over and away he went – first one in line. He often told that story with a glint of pride in his eyes for that old car. Never had a car that could match that one as far as he was concerned.

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Shangas
post Nov 11 2007, 01:57 PM
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LOL!! That's a wonderful story, FG.

My father used to tell me about his neighbour who had this old beat-up 1940s jalopy. My father grew up in a rather poor part of Malaysia (We're Chinese by ethnicity, though). And anyway, my dad's neighbour had the job of the town bus-driver. He'd go around carting the kids to school in his busted up car. My dad, being the next-door neighbour, always got to sit up front with the driver.

Dad used to tell me how each morning, he'd watch his neighbour struggling to get the car started. It was a really hopeless piece of junk and dad said he'd watch the man kneeling there for ages, cranking and cranking and cranking trying to get the damned thing to start. Some days, it wouldn't start at all, and the kids got a day off school as a result.

On the theme of old cars, my dad told me that once upon a time, my uncle (his half-brother, some 14 years older than my dad), used to own one of those old 'Baby' Austin 7s. I never saw the car, but I'd love to think that someone in my family once owned a vintage automobile! laugh.gif


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Ian House
post Nov 11 2007, 02:54 PM
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Flap, Shangas,

Those are WONDERFUL car stories! For some reason, when I read them, I visualize Jack Benny and his old 1923 Maxwell :-)


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Flapper Girl
post Nov 11 2007, 04:21 PM
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Welcome Shangas and thanks for breathing new life into the forum. New “faces” and ideas are always a delight - not to minimize the importance of the old gang, as they are a joy unto themselves, as well.

I remember those baby Austin cars. There was a dealership just down the street from us in the late 1940’s. They were soooo small. In my mind’s eye I can still picture my Dad cranking his old car. What precious memories!

Ian, do you mean to tell me that Maltesers are the real McCoy and Whoppers are only a poor substitute? I love those things, chalk and all! P’haps they remind me of the “goodies” we ingested in grade school.

Flap

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Ian House
post Nov 11 2007, 05:08 PM
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QUOTE(Flapper Girl @ Nov 11 2007, 11:21 AM) *
Ian, do you mean to tell me that Maltesers are the real McCoy and Whoppers are only a poor substitute? I love those things, chalk and all! P'haps they remind me of the "goodies" we ingested in grade school.

Flap,

Since I fancy myself to be something of a life-long connoisseur of chocolate covered malt balls, I am prepared to make the claim that Maltesers are, indeed, superior to our Whoppers. They are a bit smaller, much richer and the foamy honeycomb malt is not as chalky (and tasteless like a sub-par malty piece of drywall). I think that Maltesers must use more (and/or better) chocolate as well. They are more expensive than Whoppers which, after all, are sold in large milk carton-like containers. If you haven't ever tried a Malteser, I insist that you make the effort to order them online from a trusted vendor.

The Maltester, introduced in 1936, predated Whoppers by three years.




This post has been edited by Ian House: Nov 11 2007, 05:43 PM


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