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> The Jazz Family (1900-1939), compiling a full list of genres...
Ian House
post May 26 2007, 08:39 PM
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This is a work in progress:

I thought it would be an interesting and educational exercise to try to compile a comprehensive list of all the musical genres that typically get classified as Jazz (or contributing influences to Jazz) between 1900-1939 ... and to provide a single recording for each, one that best represents that genre. I am hoping that others on this board will contribute their own expertise of their own favorite genre(s) so that this might develop into an accurate and exhaustive list based on a knowledgeable consensus. Please forgive my initial attempts at defining certain genres unfamiliar to me ... Like everyone else, I have my own selective preferences for certain styles, mostly the dance bands from the 20's and 30's. This would include other genres (or subgenres ?) such as "songbirds" and "crooners" as well as "collegiate" and even a small and limited amount of "novelty" ... I also have an equally dedicated passion for the Harlem sound which, still in the family of Jazz, seems to exist in its own separate universe completely detached from the lively commercial dance bands of the same era. Of course, much of this can be attributed to the racial and cultural demographics of that period.

In this family, according the history of Jazz that I am familiar with, there are four parents, not two! Ken Burns accounts for the roots of Jazz in New Orleans in the middle to late 19th Century. It developed when four separate musical styles came together into one "gumbo": military marches, blues, Cajun/Creole and the African-American spirituals heard in Congo Square. This new music, once born in the Deep South, migrated to the Midwest to Chicago and Kansas City and finally east to New York City.

_ _ _

Please feel free to suggest any additions, subtractions or substitutions. The years provided indicate the performance date only and not necessarily the authoring date. I am still looking for information in regard to early square dance recordings, if any. For now, I need to use a placeholder recording from 1949 by Bob Wills. (update: Don (Roseman) found a proper square dance call for us from 1927! -Thanks Don)

I've probably overlooked several genres. Can anybody think of any more?

Most of the linked recordings are sourced from the incredible Jazz-On-Line website.


_ _ _



Marching Band
John Philip Sousa -Washington Post March (1912)


New Orleans Dixieland
Original Dixieland Jazz Band -At the Jazz Band Ball (1918)

Spiritual
Paul Robeson -Deep River (1927)

Cajun
Leo Soileau's Four Aces -Frankie and Johnny

Ragtime
Scott Joplin -Maple Leaf Rag (1923)

Classical
Louis Moreau Gottschalk - Polka in B Flat (circa 1858)

Wartime Patriotic
George M. Cohen -Over There (1917)

Tin Pan Alley
Irving Berlin -Kate Smith - God Bless America (1939)


Stride Piano
Fats Waller and His Rhythm - Honeysuckle Rose (1934)

Broadway
George & Ira Gershwin (Whiteman) - Oh, Lady Be Good (1924)

Hollywood
Harry Warren (Art Kahn's Orchestra) - Forty-Second Street (1933)

Animation
Harry Reser And His Eskimos -Walt Disney, Who's Afraid Of the Big Bad Wolf? (1933)

Chicago Style
Louis Armstrong's Hot Seven w/ Jelly Roll Morton -Chicago Breakdown (1927)

Country-Oldtime
The Carter Family - Wildwood Flower (1928)

Country-Traditional
Roy Acuff - The Great Speckled Bird (1936)

Cowboy-Western
Sons of the Pioneers -Tumblin' Tumbleweeds (1936)

Square Dance - Country Dance
Dykes Magic City Trio - Tennessee Girls (1927)

Jug-Hobo
Memphis Jug Band -Gator Wobble (1934)

Minstrel
Al Jolson -Sonny Boy (1928)

Foreign Language
Josephine Baker et les Comedian Harmonists -Espabilate (1935)

British
George Formby - When I'm Cleaning Windows (1936)

Irish
Billy Murray -Officer Kelly (1924)

Scottish
Sir Harry Lauder - Roamin' In The Gloamin'

Jewish
My Yiddishe Momme - Sophie Tucker (1928)


German Theme
George Olson and His Music - Listen To The German Band (1932)

Russian Theme
Waring's Pennslyvanians - Bolshevik (1926)

Chinese Theme
Coon Sanders Nighthawk Orchestra - Hong Kong Dream Girl (1925)

Cuban Theme
Red Nichols and His Orchestra - Peanut Vendor (1931)

Hawaiian Theme
Annette Hanshaw - Singin' In the Rain (1929)

Nursery
Jack Hylton and His Orchestra -Match Parade (1931)

Gospel
Chuck Wagon Gang -Church in the Wildwood (1936)

Collegiate
Rudy Vallee -Betty Co-ed (1930)

Dance Band
Paul Whiteman -Charleston (1925)

Sweet Band
Guy Lombardo - Auld Lang Syne (1939)

Mickey Mouse Band
Lawrence Welk - Shame On You

Hotel Orchestra
Jimmy Joy's Baker Hotel Orchestra - Red Hot Henry Brown (1925)

Songbird
Annette Hanshaw -Lovable and Sweet (1929)

Torch Song
Ruth Etting - Mean To Me (1929)

Boop-A-Doop
Helen Kane - Dangerous Nan McGrew (1930)

Crooner
Bing Crosby -You're Getting To Be A Habit With Me (1933)

Depression Song
Ben Selvin and His Orchestra - Whistle and Blow Your Blues Away (1932)

Scat
Cab Calloway -Nagasaki (1935)

Harmony
The Mills Brothers - Tiger Rag (1934)

Yodeling
Elton Britt - Chime Bells (1934)

Talking Singers
Ted Lewis and His Band - On The Sunny Side Of The Street (1930)

Laughing
Okeh Laughing Record (1923)

Novelty
Hoosier Hot Shots -Breezin' Along With The Breeze (1937)

Kansas City
Bennie Moten w/ Count Basie -Band Box Shuffle (1929)

Harlem
Duke Ellington -Creole Love Song (1927)

Work Song
Ragtime Henry Thompson - John Henry (1927)

Blues
Bessie Smith -Down Hearted Blues (1923)

Boogie Woogie
Pinetop Smith -Pinetop's Boogie Woogie (1929)

Bluegrass
Wade Mainer and Zeke Morris - Riding On That Train 45 (1937)

Swing
Artie Shaw -Begin the Beguine (1938)



.


This post has been edited by Ian House: Jul 29 2007, 03:46 AM


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Victor C. Brunsw...
post May 27 2007, 02:22 AM
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Ethnic (Non-Minstrel)
Officer Kelly -- Billy Murray (1924)
Hong Kong Dream Girl -- Coon-Sanders Nighthawk Orchestra (1925)
These two are my favorites from this genre so it was a sort of toss-up

Nursery Song (for want of a better term)
The Match Parade -- Jack Hylton and his Orchestra (1931)


Torch Song
Mean To Me -- Ruth Etting (1929)

This post has been edited by Victor C. Brunswick: May 27 2007, 02:44 AM
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Ian House
post May 27 2007, 02:33 AM
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QUOTE(Victor C. Brunswick @ May 26 2007, 08:22 PM) *



Thanks Victor ... You know, I was considering this category but I wasn't quite sure if it was a subset of "Songbird" or not ...? But now you've convinced me to dedicate a genre to it. I'll add it right now.

The other one I was thinking about was "Scat Song" ... Whaddya think? Should it be its own genre?


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Ian House
post May 27 2007, 03:01 AM
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QUOTE(Victor C. Brunswick @ May 26 2007, 08:22 PM) *
Ethnic (Non-Minstrel)
Officer Kelly -- Billy Murray (1924)
Hong Kong Dream Girl -- Coon-Sanders Nighthawk Orchestra (1925)
These two are my favorites from this genre so it was a sort of toss-up

Nursery Song (for want of a better term)
The Match Parade -- Jack Hylton and his Orchestra (1931)

Torch Song
Mean To Me -- Ruth Etting (1929)



Just GREAT Victor!, These are wonderful suggestions, I will add them ASAP. I'm afraid, without the appropriate background knowledge, I will be letting my personal bias towards Billy Murray decide the winner ... but it's not set in stone.

I think Don (Roseman) may be offering another suggestion about the influences of classical music on Jazz...


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Roseman
post May 27 2007, 03:04 AM
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Hey Ian,

A super post on the Jazz Family. You've given us a lot to mull over and it may take a while for some to respond. The only thing I can add right now, and I'm not sure if you'll agree with it. The first thing I thought of when you mentioned the origins of jazz and ref. to Ken Burns and etc., is that jazz just didn't evolve one day from a group of identities, it evolved from many previous generations. Another love of mine is classical music, and a composer that I've thought of as his music being a forecast of what was to follow is Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829-1869). He was an American classical composer born in New Orleans. When listnening to some of his piano compositions, you get a sense that it's a forerunner of rag. It's even in some of his orchestra works, particularly his - Grande Tarantelle for Piano & Orchestra. Now it's 1800's classical music (not romantic style), but it's different.

I went searching for some clips and found a couple. I got the excerpt from Wikipedia, and this writer seems to think along the same lines. Other predecesors would be the Strauss Family; in the mid 1800's they were the kings of the waltz and polka and quadrills; the pop music of their day.

So, what I'm saying is that maybe you need to add another entry for these classical guys, they made the first digs in this jazz-well. And I think Gottschalk would be the one to represent this group.

Don...



Cuban Danse
http://www.theclassicalshop.net/mp3samples...03211T01D01.wma

Polka in B flat
http://www.theclassicalshop.net/mp3samples...03207T01D01.wma


Wiki (This guy could easily fit into the jazz age with his slick-back hair)l
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Moreau_Gottschalk

quote..
"Gottschalk's music was very popular during his lifetime, and his earliest compositions created a sensation in Europe. Early pieces like "Media:Le Bananier" and "Bamboula" were based on Gottschalk's memories of the music he heard during his youth in Louisiana, and were regarded as magnificently exotic by the critics of the time. Throughout his life, Gottschalk used a variety of non-traditional, ethnically derived material for many of his compositions. Notable examples include the "Souvenir de Porto Rico" and "The Banjo, Grotesque Fantasie". These ethnic and national-character pieces were of high rhythmic originality based as they are on Afro-Cuban music that was largely unexplored by composers of the time. These pieces paved the way for Ragtime and subsequently Jazz and are regarded as his finest and most important work".
...unquote

This post has been edited by Roseman: May 27 2007, 03:08 AM
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victrolajazz
post May 27 2007, 03:59 AM
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QUOTE(Roseman @ May 26 2007, 10:04 PM) *


Not at all difficult to see where Scott Joplin (1868-1917) may have received inspiration.

Eddie the Collector
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laughland
post May 27 2007, 04:03 AM
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There was a period of ukelele-laden Hawaiian music during the 20s... I don't consider myself expert enough in the genre to suggest one offhand. It's not one of my preferred genres from the era.

How about a category to encompass latin music such "The Peanut Vendor"?

And what about the baby-voice songs done by Helen Kane and others. Does that fit into any of your current categories?


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Ian House
post May 27 2007, 04:05 AM
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QUOTE(victrolajazz @ May 26 2007, 09:59 PM) *
Not at all difficult to see where Scott Joplin (1868-1917) may have received inspiration.


Isn't Gottschalk just TERRIFIC?!!

Thank you Don for introducing him to me. It's pure classical ragtime. Do you happen to know the years that these compositions were written? ... and, if you like, I can switch out the "Cuban Dance" for the polka -just let me know...


.


This post has been edited by Ian House: May 27 2007, 06:41 AM


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Ian House
post May 27 2007, 04:15 AM
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QUOTE(laughland @ May 26 2007, 10:03 PM) *
There was a period of ukelele-laden Hawaiian music during the 20s... I don't consider myself expert enough in the genre to suggest one offhand. It's not one of my preferred genres from the era.

How about a category to encompass latin music such "The Peanut Vendor"?

And what about the baby-voice songs done by Helen Kane and others. Does that fit into any of your current categories?


Here's what I suggest: Instead of just "Ethnic", I think I will dedicate sub-genres for well-represented candidates (ie. Ethnic-Irish, Ethnic-Hawaiian, Ethnic-Cuban, etc as they come up) The Peanut Vendor is an OBVIOUS winner for Cuban IMHO ... I like Annette's Hawaiian numbers very much but are they the BEST representation of that genre??

And I think a "Boop-A-Doop" genre can be justified ... but I think that Helen Kane should take home the prize before awarded to others.


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laughland
post May 27 2007, 04:37 AM
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Alright - I like the revisions Ian.

Now how about one more idea....

What about the vocal close harmony groups like the Mills Brothers or the Comedian Harmonists?


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Ian House
post May 27 2007, 04:40 AM
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QUOTE(laughland @ May 26 2007, 10:37 PM) *
Alright - I like the revisions Ian.

Now how about one more idea....

What about the vocal close harmony groups like the Mills Brothers or the Comedian Harmonists?



Oh No!! Tough pick, the Mills Brothers or the Boswell Sisters? I'll give you the pick because I already snuck in a vote for Cab as our scat singer when nobody was looking!


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Ian House
post May 27 2007, 04:45 AM
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I'm starting to wonder if we're going to leave all of our whistlers and yodelers out in the cold ... with their sad little whistler and yodeler faces pressed against the window ...?


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laughland
post May 27 2007, 04:48 AM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ May 26 2007, 11:40 PM) *
Oh No!! Tough pick, the Mills Brothers or the Boswell Sisters? I'll give you the pick because I already snuck in a vote for Cab as our scat singer when nobody was looking!

A touch choice indeed. No pressure! tongue.gif

I guess I would pick the Mills Brothers because I believe they more or less established the genre. And my first impulse is to use Mills Brothers - Goodbye Blues as the representative piece but there are other good possibilities such as Tiger Rag.

This post has been edited by laughland: May 27 2007, 04:53 AM


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Ian House
post May 27 2007, 04:59 AM
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QUOTE(laughland @ May 26 2007, 10:48 PM) *
A touch choice indeed. No pressure! tongue.gif

I guess I would pick the Mills Brothers because I believe they more or less established the genre. And my first impulse is to use Mills Brothers - Goodbye Blues as the representative piece but there are other good possibilities such as Tiger Rag.



I went with your first impulse ... but if you find yourself having trouble sleeping tonight, I can always switch it out in the morning.

Not bad! I guess that also takes care of our "Follow the Bouncing Ball" category as well!


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MJJ
post May 27 2007, 05:02 AM
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Only 1 mention of Louis Armstrong -- and none of Jelly Roll Morton?? ohmy.gif

This post has been edited by MJJ: May 27 2007, 05:03 AM
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