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Flapper Girl
Posted on: Mar 18 2011, 05:38 PM


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Royal Caribbean Cruise has come up with another vintage song for their commercials. This time it's "Are You Having Any Fun". Anyone know the name of the band and artist? I hope they keep 'em coming, as it could lead to getting people who are not familiar with the music of the past to take a listen and want to hear more.

FG
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #20374 · Replies: 8 · Views: 11217

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Feb 24 2011, 11:19 PM


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Hi laughland. It's been a while. I guess we are dating ourselves by using that expression. A little search revealed it was first used in an Annie Oakley movie in 1935, but it really became more widely used around 1949. Ain't that the bee's knees?
FG

  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #17777 · Replies: 8 · Views: 11217

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Feb 23 2011, 01:05 AM


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That old guy still has a lot of fire left in the furnace. Thanks for posting it. What a hoot!
  Forum: Technical Issues · Post Preview: #17499 · Replies: 6 · Views: 13928

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Feb 23 2011, 12:25 AM


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Bob wins the cigar. It is definitely Hal Kemp with Skinny Ennis on vocal. I had never heard the song before the commercial came along. They only play a short portion of it and it got stuck in my brain. Had to hear the whole thing. Thanks Bob
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #17497 · Replies: 8 · Views: 11217

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Feb 22 2011, 07:09 PM


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Good for you, Wagner von Drupen-Sachs. The banjo is probably the only true American instrument. Do you play the five string with a bit of finger picking?
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #17468 · Replies: 8 · Views: 8499

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Feb 22 2011, 06:54 PM


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It's the "Doggone Blues" without a doubt.
FG

  Forum: Technical Issues · Post Preview: #17465 · Replies: 6 · Views: 13928

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Feb 22 2011, 03:07 PM


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Royal Caribbean Cruise has been airing a commercial featuring the song "It's Winter Again". Does anyone know the name of the artist in that commercial? I found two versions on You Tube - one by Hal Kemp and the other by Isham Jones, but these are not the versions used in the commercial. It seems the song dates back to 1932. It's so nice to hear music from the Radio Dismuke era on commercial TV once in a while. It makes me sit up and take notice whenever it comes on. Love it!
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #17445 · Replies: 8 · Views: 11217

Flapper Girl
Posted on: May 16 2010, 12:43 PM


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Just want to add a note on Roy Smeck to Dismuke. When I took guitar lessons nearly a hundred years ago, my teacher's instruction books included those of Roy Smeck (mainly for Hawiian steel guitar). I believe he was an accomplished musician in other stringed instruments, as well. When you mentioned his name in a banjo recording you played during your special program, it brought back memories of my childhood days practicing my lessons.

Thank you derekpara for your kind words.

Yes, Bob, I am just waking up from my winter's nap. Spring has come to New England and it's glorious. Hope you are making good progress on the guitar playing.





  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #13292 · Replies: 12 · Views: 10849

Flapper Girl
Posted on: May 15 2010, 05:53 PM


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Hi Guys!

Thoroughly enjoying your Record Collector's Party today. The record selections are great as usual and I really liked the live accordion numbers by Matt. Never hear the accordion played anymore, unfortunately. I always enjoyed it and still do, although it is now considered out of vogue in the current scheme of things. Who are "they" to tell us what we are supposed to like???

Thanks for all you do to promote real music. I don't post much on the forum any more, but am still a loyal listener of Radio Dismuke and the music we love.

Best wishes.




  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #13289 · Replies: 12 · Views: 10849

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Nov 14 2009, 11:54 PM


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Hey Ian, It's been a while. Hope all is well with you. Where is the rest of the old gang - Bob, Laughland, Doc Savage where are you? Are you listening?

I have been particularly enjoying the Big Band Era part of the broadcast, as the early 40's was when I first became aware of the music of the day. By that time I was out of diapers and bouncing around to the music I was hearing on the radio. So many of the songs I learned back then are still some of my favorites today. Many wonderful memories associated with them from childhood days. Roseman, I believe we are about the same vintage so you must remember these songs, as well. Hokey to some but oh so sweet to me.


  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #12331 · Replies: 8 · Views: 7324

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Nov 14 2009, 04:40 PM


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I am listening to the Dismuke special musical program, which began at 10:00 this morning in the Eastern time zone. I plan to catch the entire presentation over the next two days it will be on. Always enjoy the banter and great records shared by Dismuke and friends. It is coming in loud and clear here in New England. Thanks guys.

Think I will take my peanut butter in the form of fudge rather than in that peanut drink - a much better use of calories.











  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #12327 · Replies: 8 · Views: 7324

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Feb 21 2009, 06:52 PM


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Thanks for posting Clara’s website, Shangas. What a sweetheart! She certainly has a keen sense of humor and her videos are precious and fun to watch. She reminds me a lot of my Aunt Eva, who made egg soup and other simple meals she had learned during the Depression. My aunt's version of egg soup was made with hard cooked eggs but was essentially the same, except she used milk instead of water. Those who lived during those difficult years carried many of those same recipes with them into the ‘40’s, as did my mother. They filled the void and fed the multitudes when there was little money to do it with. As Clara says, potatoes were the mainstay and were included at every meal in one form or another. Growing up in the ‘40’s I remember my Mom always had a can or two of Spam on hand to fall back on and I understand it is making a comeback in these difficult times. Other popular dishes were salmon pea wiggle, creamed cod, and chipped beef (which had another name I won’t mention here). Of course, there was also the old standby mac and cheese. Wonder if anyone else remembers other mealtime favorites they ate as kids?
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #11178 · Replies: 2 · Views: 5354

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Feb 13 2009, 04:24 PM


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The lyrics to this song comes to mind. I don't know anything about the background - where it came from or when, and I don't know if there are other verses. If there are, I have never heard them.

"I had a hat when I came in, I hung it on the rack,
I'll have a hat when I go out or break somebody's back,
A peaceful man I am, I am and I don't want to shout,
But I had a hat when I came in and I'll have a hat when I go out!"


  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #11099 · Replies: 13 · Views: 14625

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Oct 19 2008, 12:09 AM


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Except for a couple hours when I was out this afternoon, I have been enjoying the Radio Dismuke special most of the day. I hope to catch what I missed when it comes around again. The Crown records from Matt’s collection were of particular interest to me as they were recorded in the early 30’s. My parents were married in 1932 and it was interesting to hear the music they must have been listening to during that time period. Thanks so much for sharing your records and sending all that wonderful music our way. Really nice job, fellas!

  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #10627 · Replies: 1 · Views: 2913

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Sep 28 2008, 06:28 PM


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In doing research on freight trains a few years back, I was told that a locomotive could pull as many as fifty freight cars behind it. I found that amazing. It had to be a mighty powerful engine. I remember steam locomotives going by my house as a kid and they are something I've never forgotten - such wonderful memories of sight and sound. The flag men used hand held lanterns at the railroad crossings after dark and I remember them coming to plow the tracks after snow storms. Oh how I yearn for that scene from childhood.

  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #10495 · Replies: 18 · Views: 23122

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Sep 28 2008, 03:33 PM


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Hi Ian! How have you been? Yes, it would be great fun to step onto Market Street and explore some of the shops along the route, dodging the traffic as we go. Give me time to up my life insurance and I’ll meet you there.

Oddly enough 1905 has a significance to me, as my mother was born that year. She was one of nine children and her mother did the wash on a scrub board, using lye soap she made from recycled cooking fat. I believe it was used only for the laundry and not as a bath bar. Pity the poor complexion if it were, as it undoubtedly didn't have the properties of Oil of Olay. Fels Naptha soap was the manufactured version and is still sold today - a good remedy for poison ivy. Monday was “Wash Day” and the ironing was done on Tuesday. The heavy irons were heated on top of the wood stove and when the first one lost its heat, another was attached to the handle to continue on. Materials were far from wrinkle free and most everything had to be ironed.

Around April or May, spring cleaning began and every room was stripped and cleaned from top to bottom. Curtains were washed, doilies starched and the large rugs were rolled up and taken outside, where they were hung over the clothesline and beaten to death. It was pure drudgery and an intensive and aggressive assault on dirt and grime. With the advent of the washing machine, electric irons and vacuum cleaners, it made the workload so much easier.

And so life goes on.........

FG
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #10494 · Replies: 25 · Views: 27214

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Sep 27 2008, 05:32 PM


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I am struck at how few women were out and about, as compared to men and youths. Perhaps the majority were at home baking cookies on that particular day. I don't recall seeing adults with small children in tow either.

I wonder how many accidents were recorded per week? With so much risk taking, there had to be some - either that or they had extraordinary guardian angels in those days.

It is certainly an interesting and fun video.

FG
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #10487 · Replies: 25 · Views: 27214

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Dec 29 2007, 11:11 PM


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I will be particularly interested in the songs of the Depression era. My parents were married in the midst of the Depression in 1932, and it will be interesting to hear more of the music they were listening to during that time period. My father was one of the lucky ones who maintained his job throughout, although his hours were cut considerably. At least they had a paycheck coming in, even though it amounted to only $8.00 per week. Somehow they got by - paid their rent and put food on the table, with the help of a garden and some careful management. There was certainly no money left over for frills and extras. Not exactly the "good old days" people reminisce about with fond memories.

FG
  Forum: Recommendations · Post Preview: #8595 · Replies: 14 · Views: 12730

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Dec 29 2007, 06:43 PM


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Any song where Bing displays his tremendous talent for whistling is a favorite of mine. There was a PBS special televised last week, which featured both Bing and Perry Como. It certainly brought back wonderful memories of two unforgettable crooners - two well-loved personalities never to be duplicated, not only for their voices but for their presence on stage.

FG
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #8590 · Replies: 9 · Views: 7659

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Dec 29 2007, 01:23 AM


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Eddie,

The four of you make a good combination and always do a nice job with the broadcasts. I hope you will be queuing up Auld Lang Syne, along with your other goodies. I know Dismuke is not overly fond of the sweetest music this side of heaven, but to me New Year's isn't New Year's without the strains of those sweet saxophones.

FG

  Forum: Recommendations · Post Preview: #8580 · Replies: 14 · Views: 12730

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Dec 28 2007, 04:03 PM


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Dismuke, Eddie, Jerry and Matt,

Looking forward to your New Year's Eve broadcast. As I am on EST, I can't guarantee I will still be listening at 3:00 AM, but I will pick it up again with the re-broadcast.

Hope all the technical aspects run smoothly. Good luck and Happy New Year!

FG
  Forum: Recommendations · Post Preview: #8571 · Replies: 14 · Views: 12730

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Dec 17 2007, 12:55 AM


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"The Syncopated Clock" brings me back to my typing class in high school. Our teacher used to play a recording of it and the whole class would type along in rhythm. Another one he used was Tommy Dorsey's Boogie Woogie. Both have a distinct beat and were perfect for that purpose. I still love those tunes today.

FG
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #8506 · Replies: 19 · Views: 20047

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Dec 16 2007, 07:57 PM


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Such an interesting story behind My Grandfather's Clock. I wonder if it is just a folk tale or whether it actually happened that way? I was surprised about the coincidence of it having been written the same year of my uncle's birth. Maybe that was why he liked it so much - a connection in that they were of the same vintage. I met him when I was ten and he was an old man at that time - a rather grandfatherly man, so in my mind I can envision him as the grandfather in that song.

Thanks, FG
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #8501 · Replies: 19 · Views: 20047

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Dec 16 2007, 07:04 PM


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Eddie,
Thanks for posting the lyrics to "My Grandfather's Clock". I don't recall ever hearing the last verse. Did you find the lyrics on sheet music? If so, is there a date to indicate when it was written and the name of the person who wrote it? One of my uncles was born in 1876. He was a number of years older than my father and my Dad said he remembered him singing it a lot when they were young. I wonder if it was a "new" song at the time or one that had been around for a while.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #8499 · Replies: 19 · Views: 20047

Flapper Girl
Posted on: Dec 16 2007, 03:23 PM


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A very old clock song is "My Grandfather's Clock". I think it dates back to the 1890's or earlier.

FG
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #8497 · Replies: 19 · Views: 20047

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