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> I've Got Those Plastic Blues, I pine for wood, porcelin and marble...
Ian House
post Apr 12 2007, 08:35 PM
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QUOTE(Flapper Girl @ Apr 12 2007, 02:15 PM) *
It's difficult to describe.


Well then, perhaps some photos from eBay will help. Flap, as you can see, your descriptions are extremely accurate and spot on!

Carnival Glass:




Depression Glass:



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Ian House
post Apr 12 2007, 08:47 PM
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Contemporary Glass:




.

This post has been edited by Ian House: Apr 12 2007, 09:00 PM


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Roseman
post Apr 12 2007, 09:29 PM
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O.K. Gang,

This plastic thread needs a little attention. People are not taking the situation serious enough and we need to educate them on the real facts. So here's a few links and sites to take a look at and hopefully everyone will see the light.


Made from corn and is compostable (Maybe they can work on this and it can be edible)
http://cornplastic.kelseypromo.com/

Good use of recycle plastic, watch the slide show for all of the products.
http://www.plasticboards.com/

Now you must admit, this is real creative recycling...
http://plasticlumberyard.com/spyonabird.htm

Now here's something that must be the coolest thing to come along since Berliner and the flat disk.
http://createdigitalmusic.com/?p=23





And what would be the replacement material for this?



Don... biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif

This post has been edited by Roseman: Apr 12 2007, 10:11 PM
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Ian House
post Apr 12 2007, 09:40 PM
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Plastic Lumber? I suppose that's no longer considered to be an oxymoron...

And Corn Plastic? Is it microwave-safe? Or does it just turn into more popcorn...?


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Flapper Girl
post Apr 13 2007, 12:21 AM
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Now, let me see..... What did folks use before plastic commodes came upon the scene? Oh, now I remember..... Good old fashioned chamberpots. Made of porcelain, they were wondrous things to behold, especially at 2 or 3 AM on a cold, wintry night. Sure beat the alternative of making the trek outside to the little house with the half moon on the door.

Flap
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Roseman
post Apr 13 2007, 01:34 AM
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QUOTE(Flapper Girl @ Apr 12 2007, 06:21 PM) *
Now, let me see..... What did folks use before plastic commodes came upon the scene? Oh, now I remember..... Good old fashioned chamberpots. Made of porcelain, they were wondrous things to behold, especially at 2 or 3 AM on a cold, wintry night. Sure beat the alternative of making the trek outside to the little house with the half moon on the door.

Flap


Ah yes, I remember those days and lived them too. I was almost a teenager before my parents put in indoor plumbing. There were five of us in a two bedroom house. Momma and Daddy had one bedroom and three of us boys sleep in the other bedroom. We slept three to a bed; and being the youngest, I got to sleep in the middle with the big brothers mashing and poking me all night.

Momma cooked on an old wood stove and one of my chores was to make sure the kindling box was always full. I failed once in this responsiblilty and remember my daddy rolling me out of bed early one morning and sent me out in the dark, cold winter morning to prepare a whole box of fresh kindling. I don't remember ever failing to uphold that chore again.

Wood stoves were great in the winter, an extra source for heat, but boy in these southern summers, it was terrible. Cook, eat, and get out of the house, and hoped things cooled down by bedtime.

Ah, the good old days...???

Don...




This post has been edited by Roseman: Apr 13 2007, 01:36 AM
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Ian House
post Apr 13 2007, 01:47 AM
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Don,

Thanks for sharing those childhood memories. It's quite fascinating to hear stories about that time period.

Have you always lived in North Carolina? And, it almost sounds like you were in a more rural environment. If so, did your parents grow up with electricity, or did it come along with FDR's "Rural Electrification" program ... ? And, if not rural, what was the closest city?



.

This post has been edited by Ian House: Apr 13 2007, 01:58 AM


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Roseman
post Apr 13 2007, 02:22 AM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 12 2007, 07:47 PM) *
Don,

Thanks for sharing those childhood memories. It's quite fascinating to hear stories about that time frame.

Have you always lived in North Carolina?



I spent a couple years in the midwest, floating up and down the Illinois and Missouri rivers under Uncle Sam's guidance in the U.S. Coast Guard. Being stationed in Peoria and Kansas City. Later my civilian job took me to Tennesse for a few years, but the rest has been here in NC.

Let me share this river experience. This was in 1957 and our river boat had stopped for the night on the Illinois river, far from any town or city and I had the midnight watch up in the wheel house. There were several old stern paddle river boats that were still in use primarily to take people out on the river for dining and dancing. Mostly dixieland music. They would spent a couple days and nights in a town and then move on down the river to the next town. I was on watch and it was about 2 or 3 in the morning, no noise, except the bugs and frogs and what little noise I was making. Then I heard some strange distance sound coming from the river. A sound I had never heard before. I immediately got out the binoculars to see what I could and there in the far distance was this old river boat churning its way up the river, going to the next town to put on it's show. Being all of about 19 years old, chills ran up my spine and I felt as if I was instantly transformed back to the 1800's. It was an experience that was totally unreal and to this day I can still see and feel the excitement of that experience. Shades of Mark Twain.

Don...



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Ian House
post Apr 13 2007, 03:04 AM
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How wonderful to have such a vivid memory of that riverboat... Isn't the name Mark Twain somehow a derivation of the call that a riverboat captain would shout out? I'll have to visit Wikipedia for clarification on that.

When I drove across the country to get to Indiana, I spent an evening in St. Louis and saw a paddleboat there near the Arch. When I go to the Tulsarama event in June, I plan to pass through there again ... and do a little Route 66-ing along the way to OK...


EDIT:

I just found a single sentence on Encarta accounting for the origin of "Mark Twain":

"Seeking a good pen name, he chose Mark Twain, a Mississippi riverboat phrase called out to test the water's depth; "twain," or two fathoms (12 feet) deep, meant it was safe for navigating."

This post has been edited by Ian House: Apr 13 2007, 03:12 AM


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Roseman
post Apr 13 2007, 03:09 AM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 12 2007, 07:47 PM) *
Don,


And, it almost sounds like you were in a more rural environment. If so, did your parents grow up with electricity, or did it come along with FDR's "Rural Electrification" program ... ? And, if not rural, what was the closest city?
.



I would call it semi-rural. We lived right outside the city limits in the county and we had chickens, pigs, and a cow. You must remember that during the 30's, 40's and even into the early 50's some people still had this life style and had not made the big city transition. We had electricty, but no running water. We got our water from a hand dug well. The road we lived on was dirt and in the summer was always dusty from the cars that would pass by. We did not have a telephone, television, and my daddy never owned a car or ever drove one. We walked or rode a bus. We went modern in the late 50's. I had already left home and was in the service.

Don...

p.s. We grew most of our vegetables and canned them. Later my parents build a greenhouse and started growing and selling plants. My dad grew some roses and I guess I got my interest in roses from that.

This post has been edited by Roseman: Apr 13 2007, 03:19 AM
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laughland
post Apr 13 2007, 04:04 AM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Apr 12 2007, 10:04 PM) *
How wonderful to have such a vivid memory of that riverboat... Isn't the name Mark Twain somehow a derivation of the call that a riverboat captain would shout out? I'll have to visit Wikipedia for clarification on that.

EDIT:

I just found a single sentence on Encarta accounting for the origin of "Mark Twain":

"Seeking a good pen name, he chose Mark Twain, a Mississippi riverboat phrase called out to test the water's depth; "twain," or two fathoms (12 feet) deep, meant it was safe for navigating."

You almost have the complete story here - I've read enough about Mr. Clemens to know this from memory!

On the river they would mark a put marks on the line they used for testing the depth and as you said, the second mark was at 12 feet - which as you mentioned was considered the standard depth for safe navigation.

As the leadsman kept checking the line he'd call out what mark it was on - for example, "by the mark four" or "by the mark three". The second mark was called out as "by the mark twain" or simply just "mark twain" and generally was shouted more enthusiastically than for any of the other marks because it of the significance of that depth.

This post has been edited by laughland: Apr 13 2007, 04:15 AM


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dismuke
post Apr 13 2007, 09:01 AM
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QUOTE(Roseman @ Apr 12 2007, 08:34 PM) *
Wood stoves were great in the winter, an extra source for heat, but boy in these southern summers, it was terrible. Cook, eat, and get out of the house, and hoped things cooled down by bedtime.



One thing I have always wondered is why people back then either did not have an outdoors type of stove for the summer months or else move the existing stove outdoors to some sort of covered but open air shelter that would protect the stove from rain. The last thing I would want to do in a house with no air conditioning is operate a wood stove in the summer indoors.
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Roseman
post Apr 13 2007, 10:30 AM
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QUOTE(laughland @ Apr 12 2007, 10:04 PM) *
You almost have the complete story here - I've read enough about Mr. Clemens to know this from memory!

On the river they would mark a put marks on the line they used for testing the depth and as you said, the second mark was at 12 feet - which as you mentioned was considered the standard depth for safe navigation.


As we moved into the twentith century, the Army Corps of Engineers started dredging out channels for safe navigation and the Coast Guard had the responsibility of keeping the channels marked with bouys and other markers. The harsh winters with the river ice would cause the bouys and markers to be torn loose from their anchor points and consequently they had to be re-established by the Coast Guard. A long and laborius job, but one that had it's benefits. I got to see the beauty of the river country from a different view other than rail or road. A favorite quote that's been contributed to Mark Twain is a comment he said about the Missouri river. He said it was 'the only river you could see dust blow off of it'. I believe it, it was a muddy river.





QUOTE(dismuke @ Apr 13 2007, 03:01 AM) *
One thing I have always wondered is why people back then either did not have an outdoors type of stove for the summer months or else move the existing stove outdoors to some sort of covered but open air shelter that would protect the stove from rain. The last thing I would want to do in a house with no air conditioning is operate a wood stove in the summer indoors.


Some people did do some outside cooking. Another thing was to heat your wash water for washing clothes. This was always a monday ritual at our house. Water would be heated in a big copper cauldron and than put into an old Easy electric washing machine. I was always fascinated seeing my momma do the washing. I also remember an old gentleman that lived behind out place and I liked to visit him and let him tell about his fur trapping days up in Virginia. His grandfather had been a musician in the Civil War, playing a fife. I played flute and piccolo in our HS band and he gave me his fathers fife and I still have it to this day. Anyway, he was a true outdoorsman and did a lot of cooking outside. As for moving the wood stove outside, not very pratical and besides, these were heavy kitchen appliances.

Don...

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Flapper Girl
post Apr 13 2007, 03:01 PM
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The porcelain chamberpots were usually decorated with flowers and quite elegant. The one pictured is of metal and without much class at all.

My parents had a wood stove and believe me it took an army of men to set one up, as they were cast iron and extremely heavy. No plastic here, my friends, and it separated the men from the boys! It was a half-day chore and once set in place and the stovepipe attached to the chimney, it wasn’t about to be moved again for the duration. No one would have been willing to volunteer his services each spring and fall to move it again, as it meant risking a hernia or broken back. An outside chimney would have also been necessary.

I remember the draft in the stovepipe had a lot to do with firing those babies up and you had to adjust it as necessary. Cooking on a wood stove was an art form and took a certain amount of patience and skill. Most of them were black, but my mother’s was similar to the one above – a light crème color, trimmed with aqua. As kids, we would slip the lower parts of our bodies underneath it, lying on our bellies and soaking up the heat when we came in from skating or skiing. We spent many happy hours there coloring or working on other important projects. Yes, the kitchen certainly became hot in summer when the cooking was done, but in later years my mother had a small kerosene stove she used in summer. It was housed in an attached shed, but the wood stove was still fired up when necessary.

Flapper
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matto
post Apr 14 2007, 03:37 PM
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QUOTE(dismuke @ Apr 13 2007, 04:01 AM) *
One thing I have always wondered is why people back then either did not have an outdoors type of stove for the summer months or else move the existing stove outdoors to some sort of covered but open air shelter that would protect the stove from rain. The last thing I would want to do in a house with no air conditioning is operate a wood stove in the summer indoors.



My Grandmother, who is almost 92, remembers having a "summer kitchen" on the back porch of their house. They had a separate cooking stove out there so that they could cook without heating up the house. This was the "new" house build in 1918 when my grandmother was 2. It was a novelty because of that summer kitchen and electricity.

They still had and outhouse and heated the house with coal until 1931, when the summer kitchen was enclosed and turned into a 4th bedroom and indoor bathroom. They also installed gas in the house for cooking. I still remember the 1930's gas cooking stove sitting out in the barn.

One thing to note about the house is that the interior was VERY Edwardian in style except for the bedroom and bathroom addition, which had many Art Deco elements.

When I was a child in the 1980's and my Great Grandmother passed away, I remember going into that house many times. It was a big old type of house with a foyer and all.....including a giant brass gated coal heating stove in the dining room, which was in disuse for years, but still remained. All the closets were lined with cedar, so the smell of cedar was very strong thoughout the house. My great grandmother kept the house in an old fashioned German style. I remember old furnature everywhere, and even old 20's era hats and coats in the coat closet. There was a Victor electrola in the living room and stained glass light fixtures. The house was a literal time capsule...albiet a bit worn. At that time no one had lived in the house for awhile and the wall paper was peeling down and there were bats in the chimney. My grandmother, however, kept all of the woodwork highly polished. The house extruded elements of both grandeur and decay. What is interesting is that my great-grandparents never gave in to "modern" culture. The house, as I remember, had not one element past the 1940's in it.
My great-grandparents ran a hardware and housewares store from 1910 to the 1970's. The store was founded by my great-great-grandfather in 1899.

The store closed in 1979 before I was born. It was last run by my great-uncle.
When my parents married in 1977, my Father toured the store and remembers that it was also frozen in time. It had a tin pressed ceiling, ancient ceiling fans, skylights, glass and wood counters, and shelving around the peremeter. The high shelving was accessed with giant ladders. My Dad says that it looked exactly like a 1915 picture my Grandmother has.

Unfortunately both the house and store were sold for financial reasons. The store was GUTTED and turned into an addition for the First National Bank. It now has a tacky 1980's decor with an acoustic tile cieling, gold fans, mustard yellow carpeting, cheap wood paneling, and an UGLY composite stone new front OVER the brick. All of the display cases and shelving were sold. Ironically, my great uncle still works in the same building, as a bank book-keeper at age 86. The house was sold in the 1990's after being vacant for many years. The new owners were relatives and restored the house well, although they did put in some modern tacky elements. Needless to say, it is no longer a time capsule.

This post has been edited by matto: Apr 14 2007, 04:17 PM


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