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> Jazz Portrayed in Film, Cartoon, and Radio, Discovering new favorites!
gregoryagogo
post Aug 17 2005, 10:37 PM
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I was watching Turner Classic Movies the other day, and saw the most manic jazzy cartoon featuring very sterotypical versions of black performers such as Fatts Waller, Cab Calloway, and the Mills Brothers... It's called "Swing Wedding"!! It is worth seeking out to buy...

Here's a link to purchase: Buy "Swing Wedding"!

Have fun!

Gregory wink.gif


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gregoryagogo
post Aug 17 2005, 10:46 PM
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Also, here are a couple of Radio Broadcasts of Paul Whiteman that I simply love!



The George Burns & Gracie Allen Show (PW - band leader)
1943 (Gracie's "Concerto for Scales and Clinker") 1941 - 1943 CBS Radio
http://65.45.103.7/songs/pwradio/burnsall.ram

Wizard of Oz Medley 10-4-1939 Chesterfield Presents CBS
http://65.45.103.7/songs/pwradio/wizardofo...edley100439.ram

Love,
Gregory


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laughland
post Aug 18 2005, 03:49 AM
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They showed Swing Wedding? Wow! That one is really rare. I wish I could have caught it!

Looking over the TCM schedule I'm guessing they slipped it in after maybe Swing Time on the 15th? They like to put one-reelers with related themes or titles as filler.

TCM has alot of great stuff between shows like this but sadly they don't ever list what they are in advance...


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tferbe
post Aug 18 2005, 05:17 PM
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I saw it too and was blown away by it. I never saw it before. The music was fantastic and the charactures were very strange to say the least but much like many of the records we listen to it was all part of the perceptions of the time. I love the good old days but thankfully some ideas are changing.
Ted wink.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif
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gregoryagogo
post Aug 18 2005, 05:53 PM
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QUOTE(laughland @ Aug 17 2005, 08:49 PM)
"...Looking over the TCM schedule I'm guessing they slipped it in after maybe Swing Time on the 15th?"

Yup. I think they did slip it in before or after "Swing Time"!

Gregory wink.gif


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Jarred
post Aug 19 2005, 01:36 AM
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Did that cartoon have the Calloway song "The Wedding Of Mr. And Mrs. Swing" in it? I have Cab's recording of that from 1936 and it sounds like something that may have been from a cartoon.


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gregoryagogo
post Aug 19 2005, 08:25 PM
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QUOTE(tferbe @ Aug 18 2005, 10:17 AM)
"...the charactures were very strange..."

Yeah, they were frogs in a swamp!! Fun-ny!! laugh.gif

Gregory


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laughland
post Aug 20 2005, 01:43 AM
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QUOTE(tferbe @ Aug 18 2005, 12:17 PM)
The music was fantastic and the charactures were very strange to say the least but much like many of the records we listen to it was all part of the perceptions of the time. I love the good old days but thankfully some ideas are changing.

Another reason this cartoon is shown so rarely is because near the end one frog reportedly pulls the valve off of his instrument and uses it to inject something into his arm. He then starts shouting "Swing" and dives through a drum...


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gregoryagogo
post Aug 21 2005, 08:45 PM
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In the silent movie, "My Best Girl", Mary Pickford's character pickes up a record entitled "Red Hot Mama" and puts it on a Victrolla turntable, and proceeds to dance like a "Red Hot Mama" all with no sound! A great little record playing moment in film!

Wouldn't it be neat if some one who has this film on DVD or Video sould pause the movie and see who was the recording artist on that recording! In the movie they show an extreme close-up of the label of the record. "Red Hot Mama" is clearly legible. I'm sure the recording artist was too, but I didn't think to really look at the time I viewed it on TCM. rolleyes.gif



Gregory

I'll clean this post up when I get to that one computer that lets me type those words... Boy this really es me off! Weird... it lets me type the word ... and not the opposite of Boy.


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dismuke
post Aug 21 2005, 10:06 PM
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QUOTE(gregoryagogo @ Aug 21 2005, 02:45 PM)
( I have to spell it backwards because the software at the Library is editing that word phrase out)

Have you notified someone at the library about the problem? It would seem odd that they would find the terms "girl" and "red hot" in and of themselves to be objectionable. My guess is that whoever set up the filters entered in objectionable pharses that used the terms and, instead of entering them in as exact phrases, they entered them in such a way that the software believes the library wants to filter out all of the words in the phrase.
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gregoryagogo
post Aug 22 2005, 08:22 PM
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QUOTE(dismuke @ Aug 21 2005, 03:06 PM)
QUOTE(gregoryagogo @ Aug 21 2005, 02:45 PM)
( I have to spell it backwards because the software at the Library is editing that word phrase out)

Have you notified someone at the library about the problem? It would seem odd that they would find the terms "girl" and "red hot" in and of themselves to be objectionable. My guess is that whoever set up the filters entered in objectionable pharses that used the terms and, instead of entering them in as exact phrases, they entered them in such a way that the software believes the library wants to filter out all of the words in the phrase.

Just today, the librarian pulled me asside, and asked, "Weren't you the one who filled out a comment card regarding not being able to access a certian website?", and I said, "Why yes!"...

He said it was as simple as asking the librarian to remomve the filters!

Ta Da! Problem solved!

Love,
Gregory

Ps. Sheeessssseeee I feel like I've given birth! What a long drawn-out ordeal! sad.gif mad.gif dry.gif


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Hammorama
post Sep 21 2005, 01:10 AM
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In another thread, Dismuke posted a few links to versions of "Lady Play Your Mandolin" and Ian House had a short-lived link to the Merrie Melodies cartoon version of the same. The Vitaphone cartoon orchestra, really Abe Lyman's band in this instance, is conducted by one Frank Marsales. I have seen his name only on these early Warner Bros. cartoons. He runs the hottest, snappiest orchestra on the planet in these things. If you thought you'd heard a fast version of any song, Marsales and his band can do it faster. The "Lady Play Your Mandolin" example, when compared to Dismuke's two (Lucas and Ambrose) is a case in point.

Does anyone know anything about Frank Marsales and his career? Is this possibly a pseudonym? Did he have a dance band or did he simply stay in the background at Warner's? Or maybe died prematurely?

I love "Lady Play...." also.....I believe it's by none other than Oscar Levant with lyrics by Irving Caesar. Also note the similarity to "Loveable and Sweet", also by Levant in the opening rhythm and melodic sequence of the chorus. (You can't plagerize yourself!)

Lee

Ian---Why'd you have to pull that delightful link?
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Ian House
post Sep 21 2005, 08:31 AM
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QUOTE(Hammorama @ Sep 20 2005, 07:10 PM)
Ian---Why'd you have to pull that delightful link?

Hi Lee,

I didn't mean to steal away with your mandolin! I originally meant for the post to be a temporary aside -so I attached the sound clip to my avatar. When the thread went stale, I removed the clip.

Anyway, here are the mp3s... The first one is the introductory piece that I first posted. The second one is the primary performance of the tune as it is heard in the second half of the cartoon. Unfortunately, it features an intolerably screechy Betty Boop-esque vocal by the Roxy character (Foxy's girlfriend)

Lady, Play Your Mandolin! -mp3 # 1

Lady, Play Your Mandolin! -mp3 # 2


And here is the video of the cartoon itself:

Lady, Play Your Mandolin!


_ _ _

This cartoon, made in 1931,was the first of the famous Merrie Melodies series produced by Warner Brothers right up until 1969. Obviously, it is an example of the early, primitive style of animation known as "rubberhose" (a reference to the simple artistic approach to drawing arms and legs in this early period) During this timeframe, all of the major cartoon studios simply followed in the footsteps of Disney and even substituted Mickey and Minnie for their own look-alike characters. Most of these early characters relied wholly on silly sight gags and slapstick to define their personalities. It wouldn't be until later in the 30's when the characters began to develop more refined personalities based on stronger acting and more sophisticated draftsmanship of the character models. Again, this was a direct influence of the Disney Studio's pursuit of greater and greater realism which ultimately expressed itself in the revolutionary "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" in 1937.

Frank Marsales was the first musical director for the Warner cartoons which were directed by the team of Harmon-Ising (Hugh Harman & Rudolph Ising). During the period 1930-1933, he is credited as the musical director for 66 cartoons featuring primarily the characters, Bosko (& Honey), and Foxy (& Roxy). He is thought to have worked for the Walter Lantz Studio later in the 30's. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be a lot of additional biographical information available for Frank Marsales. Perhaps Laughland or Jarred can help us out with further insights (?)...

Anyway, I'm sorry to have removed the original sound clip...

best regards,

Ian


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Fredrik
post Sep 21 2005, 01:00 PM
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Lovely cartoon Ian,

I recently saw a very similar "Merrie Melodie" based on the song "Oh, You Don't Know What You're Doing", but in that one the main character and his girlfriend had been transformed from extremely Micky Mouse-looking foxes to only slightly less Micky Mouse-looking pigs - perhaps after threats from Disney?

Fredrik
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Ian House
post Sep 21 2005, 04:23 PM
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Wow Fredrik!

You've discovered two characters (Piggy & Fluffy) who are EVEN MORE obscure than Foxy & Roxy! ...and that's pretty hard to do :-)



According to IMDB, Abe Lyman's trombonist, Orlando "Slim" Martin provided the voice for the car in this cartoon. ("You Don't Know What You're Doing" -also from 1931)


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