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> San Francisco - 1905
Roseman
post Sep 25 2008, 11:51 PM
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For those that like visuals with their music, here's a highly entertaining one. It's one of the best and most lengthy vintage films of early Americana that I've run across. It's 1905 in San Francisco on Market Street and the scene is from the front window of a cable car. The music is from The Red Mill by Victor Herbert.

Just watch the inter-action of people, autos, trollies, cable cars, horse- drawn wagons and such. As I became absorbed into this little pseudo time travel and rode the rails, I almost began to hear the sounds on the street and smell the odors of the surroundings. I felt like dodging a couple times and was startled as traffic came up from behind and passed. I caught myself looking for traffic lights. It's amazing how this seemingly disorder on the street really flowed relatively easy.

1905

Don...

This post has been edited by Roseman: Jan 7 2009, 05:28 PM
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Shangas
post Sep 26 2008, 02:29 PM
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...two, three, four, and...

With my high starched collar,
And my high-heeled shoes,
And my hair, piled high upon my head!
I went to lose a jolly,
Hour on the trolley!
And lost my heart instead!!...

Clang, clang, clang went the trolley,
Ding, ding, ding went the bell...


A very fascinating video, Roseman.


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victrolajazz
post Sep 26 2008, 09:16 PM
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An absolutely priceless piece, and the raggy Herbert score makes it even better. To see people going about their daily routines just like it was yesterday, but 103 years ago instead, is amazing. Not one of those souls could have imagined that those few seconds of their lives would be forever memorialized for the world to see over a hundred years hence. It's so much fun to watch it more than once and look for individual things, like the young man at 6:20 who darts back and forth in front of the trolley for fun, or the lady boarding the trolley somewhere between 8:00 and 9:00. There is absolutely no traffic or crowd control, but everyone seems to manage instinctively--there are numerous near-misses as people and autos dodge in and out of the traffic. It must have been a tremendously exciting time to live. The thing that makes is so poignant is to realize in just over a year some of these people would be dead from the earthquake, or have lost their loved ones or homes.

Eddie the Collector
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Ian House
post Sep 26 2008, 10:16 PM
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I've had a VERY similar reaction as Eddie's. I've watched this video several times now and it just keeps getting better and better. It's truly a hypnotic time capsule. Thank you for posting it Don ... just a breathtaking historical perspective, better than anything I've seen. Hundreds of people ... and to think, only the youngest of infants in this film could possibly still be alive today. They are all ghostly figures living their routine lives in an orchestrated and controlled chaos. This film should be played in an IMAX theatre; I'd stay in there all day watching the same 10 minutes over and over again :-)

There seems to be a somewhat "rowdy" section (starting at about 5:39 with a series of running jaywalkers, near misses, and perplexed-by-the-camera bystanders). At the 6:35 mark, you see some boys(?) hanging on to the back end of a moving auto ... and I have NO idea why?? Just for fun?

The tall building that you see at the "end of the line" on Market Street is the Ferry building ... so this trolley car ride is headed towards the San Francisco Bay. You can see the same viewpoint in this short piece of film from 1941.

Thanks again Don!

Great, great stuff ...


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Roseman
post Sep 26 2008, 10:17 PM
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QUOTE(victrolajazz @ Sep 26 2008, 05:16 PM) *
It's so much fun to watch it more than once and look for individual things,


I've watched this several times now and each time I'm glued to the action as if it were happening in real time and I'm just a passenger on the trolley. It truly is a fascinating piece of work.

A few of the observations that I will point out:

1) At the beginning, watch the gentleman crossing the street and hopping onto the back of the wagon. Was this something one could do; just hitch a free ride wilh whatever came by?
2)The dress code for being out in the public was certainly at a high standard. Coats and hats for everyone.
3) It seemed that all had equal rights to tranverse the streets. Be it pedestrian (Did that word even exist in 1905?) or vehicle.
4) Motorized cars seemed to be accepted as very normal and not novelties.
5) Note the exhaust of the car at the 9.20 mark with the passenger on the back bumper or whatever. Could this exhaust be water vapor from a steam engine?

Don...

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Ian House
post Sep 26 2008, 10:37 PM
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Roseman
post Sep 26 2008, 11:06 PM
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Ian, great side by side comparison. 1905 - 1941 What remarkable similarity in the two films. Thanks for the post.



QUOTE(victrolajazz @ Sep 26 2008, 05:16 PM) *
... in just over a year some of these people would be dead from the earthquake, or have lost their loved ones or homes.


And here are scenes from that tragedy...

1906


Don...
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Ian House
post Sep 27 2008, 12:02 AM
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Fair Is Fair!

For those of us who are a little more inclined to the East Coast, here is a WONDERFUL 1905 film of the New York City subway system. From the SF trolley to the NYC subway all in the same year! ...

Don't lose your patience in that long tunnel or you'll miss the fantastic platform scene starting at 4:55


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Ian House
post Sep 27 2008, 12:26 AM
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And while we're still in NYC in 1905 ...

Let's join the girls for a fun day at Coney Island :-)


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Roseman
post Sep 27 2008, 12:32 AM
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Since 1905 is the subject year, here are some statistics for 1905:

The average life expectancy in the U.S. was 47 years.

Only 14 percent of the homes in the U.S. had a bathtub

Only 8 percent of the homes had a telephone

A three-minute call from Denver to New York City cost eleven dollars

There were only 8,000 cars in the U.S., and only 144 miles of paved roads.

The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph.

The tallest structure in the world was the Eiffel Tower

The average wage in the U.S. was 22 cents an hour

The average U.S. worker made between $200 and $400 per year.

A competent accountant could expect to earn $2000 per year

A dentist $2,500 per year,

A veterinarian between $1,500 and $4,000 per year, and

A mechanical engineer about $5,000 per year.

More than 95 percent of all births in the U.S. took place at home

Ninety percent of all U.S. physicians had no college education

First Pizzas were made

First Popsicles - made by an 11 year old boy.

Sugar cost four cents a pound

Eggs were fourteen cents a dozen

Coffee was fifteen cents a pound

Most women only washed their hair once a month, and used borax or egg yolks for shampoo.

Canada passed a law prohibiting poor people from entering the country for any reason.

According to one pharmacist, "Heroin clears the complexion, gives buoyancy to t he mind, regulates the stomach and bowels, and is, in fact, a perfect guardian of health

Crossword puzzles, canned beer, and iced tea hadn't been invented

There was no Mother's Day or Father's Day.

Two of 10 U.S. adults couldn't read or write.

Only 6 percent of all Americans had graduated high school.

Marijuana, heroin, and morphine were all available over the counter at corner drugstores

The five leading causes of death in the U.S. were:

1. Pneumonia and influenza

2. Tuberculosis

3. Diarrhea

4. Heart disease

5. Stroke

Eighteen percent of households in the U.S. had at least one full-time servant or domestic.


Here's a fun exercise if you want to see how you would have fared had you lived in 1905. It has a British slant to it, but it still works here. Go to this page and answer the question to start your life in 1905.

You in 1905

Don...
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Ian House
post Sep 27 2008, 12:46 AM
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QUOTE(Roseman @ Sep 26 2008, 06:32 PM) *
The average life expectancy in the U.S. was 47 years.



Hey Don,

This statistic has always puzzled me a little.

Here's an interesting exercise: Just off of the top of your head, quickly write down a list of 25 people who were born in the 19th Century ... just the FIRST 25 who come to your mind.

Then, go to Wikipedia and write down their ages at death.

Here is my list:

Lee Morse 1897-1954 (57)
Thomas Edison 1847-1931 (84)
Mark Twain 1835-1910 (74)
Robert Frost 1874-1963 (88)
Franklin Roosevelt
1882-1945 (63)
Robert E. Lee 1807 -1870 (63)
John D. Rockefeller
1839-1937 (97)
Abraham Lincoln 1809-1865 (56)
Mary Todd Lincoln 1818-1882 (63)
Lillie Langtree
1853-1929 (75)
Wyatt Earp 1848-1929 (80)
Sarah Bernhardt 1844-1923 (78)
John Harvey Kellogg 1852-1943 (91)
Eveyln Nesbit 1884-1967 (83)
Jane Morris 1839-1914 (75)
George McClellan 1826-1885 (58)
Henry Ford 1863-1947 (83)
Maxfield Parrish 1870-1966 (96)
Max Fleischer 1883-1972 (89)
Will Rogers 1879-1935 (55)
Andrew Carnegie
1835-1919 (83)

Charles Chaplin
1889-1977 (88)

Sitting Bull
1831-1890 (59)
L. Frank Baum 1856-1919 (62)
Annie Oakley
1860-1926 (66)


When I look at my list, the various ages at death seem quite similar to today's statistics. My list includes at least two people who died an unnatural death. (Abe Lincoln, Will Rogers) ... and 11 on my list (more than 30%) lived to 80 years of age or older. Not ONE person on my list died in their forties.

According to the CIA Factbook, the current U.S. life expectancy (averaged) at birth is 78 years old. So, if someone was to surpass the statistics and DOUBLE the typical life expectancy, they would need to live until 156 years of age or older. Of course, this does not happen, even for the wealthiest and healthiest among us.

I wonder if this life expectancy statistic from 1905 was heavily influenced by children who died at birth?




.

This post has been edited by Ian House: Sep 27 2008, 12:56 AM


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Roseman
post Sep 27 2008, 01:14 AM
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Ian,

I would think that childhood deaths are figured into the analysis. Some statistics may also use war deaths. Death at birth and child diseases claimed many lives, but if one survived into their late teens or twenties, their chances of living to a ripe old age greatly improved. Using names of historically known people may not be the the best way to analyze life expectancy. I would think that if one could go to an old grave yard and look at the dates on the tomb stones, this might give a better representation of the real life exepectancy for a particular time frame.

Don...
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Ian House
post Sep 27 2008, 02:20 AM
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QUOTE(Roseman @ Sep 26 2008, 07:14 PM) *
Using names of historically known people may not be the the best way to analyze life expectancy.



Why not? What's your reasoning here?

Come up with your own list of 25 or 50 names and keep it diverse (different races, genders, incomes, etc) . It may surprise you. I think the deaths at child birth and deaths caused by disease must have been the primary factor in lowering the life expectancy age circa 1900.


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Roseman
post Sep 27 2008, 02:48 AM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Sep 26 2008, 10:20 PM) *
Why not? What's your reasoning here?

I'm certainly not a statistician, but logic tells me that childhood deaths would have to be included in this group of 25. Some of the numbers I've seen for childhood mortaily at birth, in the early 1900's, was around 15% per 1k births. Then one would have to add death by age of five by childhood diseases, which I think would be an equally percentage. With this logic then the average life age of the 25 would drop substanially. Just my theory.

Don...

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Ian House
post Sep 27 2008, 03:01 AM
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QUOTE(Roseman @ Sep 26 2008, 08:48 PM) *
I'm certainly not a statistician, but logic tells me that childhood deaths would have to be included in this group of 25. Some of the numbers I've seen for childhood mortaily at birth, in the early 1900's, was around 15% per 1m births. Then one would have to add death by age of five by childhood diseases, which I think would be an equally percentage. With this logic then the average life age of the 25 would drop substanially. Just my theory.

Don...




Hey Don,

I'm getting that weird feeling that we are arguing the same point.

In other words, we must simply AGREE to AGREE !!

:-)


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