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YoYo
Posted on: Apr 21 2004, 08:28 PM


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lenny,

I think the place to start is to figure out why you can't download. unsure.gif

Do you consistently get a particular error message when you attempt to download?

What exactly do you do when trying to download? I mean, do you right click, left click, click on some menu, or what?

Standard question: Do you have a firewall? Are you trying to download stuff at work, and they've got all sorts of controls on their connection to the Internet?

I suggest that we resolve the download issue first, and then move on to the bigger issue of what's possible with real audio.

Adam
  Forum: 78 RPM Records & Playback Equipment · Post Preview: #378 · Replies: 4 · Views: 7768

YoYo
Posted on: Apr 18 2004, 01:56 PM


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lenny,

Your question interests me.

Are you asking if you can send an email from the Real Player? I use the free one and I don't see any feature like that.

But if you are asking if you can send a real audio file as an attachment in an email, I think the answer is, "yes". You'll be tieing up your recipient's email though as they receive the potentially large real audio file.

Real audio's strength is the streaming capability. I'll guess that you don't have server space to store your real audio file, so instead you want to send the file instead? Maybe getting server space is a better choice than emailing a large sound file.

Have I come close to answering your question?
  Forum: 78 RPM Records & Playback Equipment · Post Preview: #372 · Replies: 4 · Views: 7768

YoYo
Posted on: Apr 15 2004, 03:08 PM


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QUOTE
Better yet, wouldn't it be great to find a downloadable version of it?

The lady's request shall not be denied. Here's an MP3 recording. It's an instrumental version, so you'll have to sing along for the words. laugh.gif

The Preacher and the Bear, trumpet recital, 2004. Performed by members of the Garritan Personal Orchestra.

Dismuke, the composer's name is Joe Arzonia. Published in Colorado, and looks like Arizona, but... wink.gif
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #366 · Replies: 3 · Views: 6817

YoYo
Posted on: Mar 19 2004, 02:26 PM


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Will o'the Wisp was performed by Otto Dobrindt and his Piano-Orchestra, Berlin.

So says a file sitting on my computer. I don't know where I got this information. blink.gif (no embarrassed smiley, so I'll go for a goofey one)
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #325 · Replies: 3 · Views: 6860

YoYo
Posted on: Mar 18 2004, 02:22 PM


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I got to thinking, wouldn't fashion reflect the same spirit of the times that I hear in the music of that era? If so I'd expect the fashion to show cheerfulness, energy, and a general feeling that "all is well".

I found three pages of pics starting here, click on the "NEXT ERA" link at the bottom-right to continue onto the other pages.

Fashion Pictures 1900-1914

On this page, by far my favorite is the colorized picture of "Evening Dress, August 1912". The huge hat with some sort of feather on top, and a dress full of complex detail all adding up to a single theme. I can see her as elegant hostess at her home, guests gathering around the piano, listening to friends playing four-hand arrangements of the latest Gavotte and Grande Marche de Concert.
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #323 · Replies: 8 · Views: 11455

YoYo
Posted on: Mar 18 2004, 01:30 PM


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Ramsey,

I appreciate you offering a suggestion. I tried an email a couple of years ago from the documentary site but I didn't get a response.

The credits only gave the name of the piece and the composer.

I came to this site figuring to expand my request and that it will hit the ears of someone who is interested in enjoying that piece in a new recording. I've recently got my hands on some fairly inexpensive software that can make a decent recording out of most any music.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #322 · Replies: 3 · Views: 6860

YoYo
Posted on: Mar 16 2004, 02:14 PM


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I've attepted to locate the sheet music for "Will o'the Wisp", from the Documentary "Ayn Rand: A Sense of Life".

Composer : Herbert Küster (1909-1986).
Original Title, German: Irrlichter.

I just learned from a publisher in Vienna, who have purchased some publishing rights to Küster's music that "Irrlichter" was not published. Shucks. I won't be discovering the sheet music to that piece on ebay.

I attempted to contact Küster's estate but I got no response.

Dismuke, or anyone, do you have any information about the record that was played in the documentary? Obviously the music was played by an orchestra at least once, for the recording. I'm wondering if I can locate the recording company and ask if they have some sort of archives of music recorded. A long shot? Any advice?
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #317 · Replies: 3 · Views: 6860

YoYo
Posted on: Mar 15 2004, 08:39 PM


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Wow, It's been several months since I posted my first post. I have returned, as YoYo's are designed to, and enjoyed reading everyones' posts. smile.gif

If you haven't already found it, Dismuke has 3 fantastic recordings of pieces by Richard Eilenberg on the Hit of the Week page, scroll down to "EXTRA". Hit of the Week

Together they capture what I love in "old" music. They say to me, "Let's do something grand!"

I've been collecting sheet music by composers c. 1900, mostly from ebay, and these three recordings have helped me actually interpret the music.

The first tune Petersburg Sleigh Ride is a Galop. I hadn't heard any old recordings of galops so I figured that they were performed at a more of a trot tempo, but if you listen, zoooom! That thing goes like crazy and makes it frantic fun. Don't ballroom dancers do Galops these days? Are galops always played super fast?

The second is The Nightinggale and the Frog a solo for piccolo. I suppose these virtuoso pieces warped into jazz solos over the years. I much prefer this composer-written solo music, like this one. What I learned from this recording was how to interpret all these old music instructions that baffled me. Listen to it and you'll hear that the tempo highly fluctuates. The piccolo starts sloooow, then picks up, faster, faster... then everyone is zooming along, and the pattern repeats. I listened, and thought, "Oh, that's what is meant by starting a phrase "un poco rit."!!! A classical musician would just get slow and stay slow. I believe the musicians had standard ways of playing and much was "just understood" among them. Doesn't all this "rubato" sound cheerful? I'm amazed.

The third is a bouncy march. Gosh, I have to hold on to my chair to keep myself from marching around the room. smile.gif What I learned from this recording was, "Oh, so that's what a recording bass sounds like." I had heard years ago that a tuba had been redesigned for early recordings. It was called a "recording bass", go figure. Its bell was curved forward to aim directly at the recording device. I think you can hear the tuba prominently because of that design.

Later,
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #315 · Replies: 37 · Views: 115726

YoYo
Posted on: Nov 27 2003, 09:20 PM


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I love listening to the recordings here on the Dismuke site, especially the earlier tunes. biggrin.gif

I listen to the older popular music for a different reason than I listen to today's popular music.

I listen to the older music to experience "life is good", for example the later half of Eilenberg's Mill In the Forest: it says to me, "wonderful, yippee!"

But I listen to today's music to experience "a momentary escape". I include as part of the popular music the material that accompanies movies and video games. This music's purpose seems to be to shutdown my thoughts, escape, and thus make it "more enjoyable" to be drawn into the world created by the movie or game. And how about the "smooth jazz" music that is advertised to smooth the rough edges of your day--rather than help you experience the glory that is your day?

Perhaps the older music helped people see the good in their lives, and today's music helps people avoid the bad in their lives.

I'd love to hear anyone's thoughts.

Here's to your good listening. smile.gif
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #210 · Replies: 37 · Views: 115726


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