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> Does anyonw know the name of this song?
Aaron2006
post Jun 15 2006, 09:17 AM
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I am having a hard time trying to figure out the name of this song.

Any ideas??

The Capitolians


P.S

I love the grand ending
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Fredrik
post Jun 20 2006, 12:25 PM
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This is a medley. I don't know all the tunes, but the one played from circa 0.34 until circa 1.20 is Rimsky-Korsakov's "Chanson Hindouie", aka "Song Of India".

Fredrik
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Mr.Jazz_Himself
post Jun 29 2006, 03:16 PM
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As mentioned before, it's a medley. I recognize "On the Road to Mandalay" "Song of India" and another classical piece. Quite a production!

Cheers,
Chris
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derekpara
post Jun 29 2006, 04:43 PM
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Great stuff ! Did you notice the banjo player discard his instrument and change to the trumpet for the grand finale ?
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Hammorama
post Jun 30 2006, 01:03 AM
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Actually I think the small excerpt in the middle is the "Hymn to the Sun" from Le Coq d'or by Rimsky-Korsakov rather than "Song of India". Anyway this whole thing is really a fantasia arrangement of "On the Road to Mandalay". If you get out your old poetry books you can sing along as it is a complete setting of the poem of the same name by Kipling.

This must be a British orchestra, as this song was much more popular in the UK than over here.

One of my favorite piano rolls is an Ampico Jumbo that combines the Song of India, Melody in F, Hymn to the Sun, the Walz of the Flowers (Delibes) and By the Waters of Minnetonka all pulled together in a dazzling fox-trot tempo. Dismuke plays the Melody in F (Welcome, sweet Springtime) in a great snappy arrangement in this style.

How wonderful it was that classical music could be seemlessly be transformed into popular fox-trots!


Lee
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victrolajazz
post Jun 30 2006, 04:03 AM
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QUOTE(Hammorama @ Jun 29 2006, 07:03 PM)
How wonderful it was that classical music could be seemlessly be transformed into popular fox-trots!

Lee

One of my favorite Bennie Kruegers is Barcarolle played in Fox Trot tempo, with Kicky-Koo on the other side, recorded in June, 1922. Unfortunately, the Red Hot Jazz version cannot be played.

Eddie the Collector
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Hammorama
post Jun 30 2006, 09:18 PM
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Oops, I think you're right, the first transitional interlude is the "Song of India"......but there's a second quote from Rimsky-Korsakov later on from "Scherezade" with all that harp arpeggio lead-in. What a production.

Aaron, more please!!
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Fredrik
post Jul 7 2006, 07:37 AM
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QUOTE
This must be a British orchestra, as this song was much more popular in the UK than over here.


I'm not quite sure about that. This orchestra looks very similar to one in another short I have on a home-made DVD another collector sent me. That band was definitely American and includes Miff Mole (tb) and Jimmy Lyttell (cl). However the poor quality of the You Tube excerpt makes it hard to tell if they are present here as well.

Fredrik
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laughland
post Jul 7 2006, 10:12 PM
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OK, I thought about this one a bit and I'm pretty sure that the piece starting around 2:00 is called The Storm and is part of Rossini's William Tell Overture.

This music appears often in cartoons for situations when (you guessed it) a storm appears.

And FWIW, even if you've never listened to any Rossini nor watched cartoons this passage may seem familiar. It was adapted into the middle of the song After The Storm. Listen at about 1:24 for the similar passage.


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