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Gart
Posted on: Jun 16 2011, 11:18 PM


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Aaron, As always, beautiful work. You sure have a talent for synching songs with movies. You're incredible!

If this gentlemen is in good shape and can be interviewed, you should contact some national dailies--Times, Guardian, Independent. I'll bet they'd love to do a story on this man and his career. If you see anything in print, please post it here.

Thanks again for another treat.

Gart
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #32624 · Replies: 3 · Views: 4811

Gart
Posted on: Jun 15 2011, 07:23 PM


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QUOTE (Roseman @ Jun 15 2011, 01:16 PM) *
Hello Gart,

Sorry that the link was not available. I use a free file hosting site and they limit how much bandwidth one can have and I had exceeded my limit and consequently they suspended my account. I have now rectified the problem and the file should be available.

Thanks for the inquiry and hope you explore the various sites I've added to the archive link.

Don...



Archival Link


Don--Got in okay. That's impressive. It'll take some time to explore, but thanks for this great resource. Gart
  Forum: Ideas & Suggestions · Post Preview: #32623 · Replies: 11 · Views: 18049

Gart
Posted on: Jun 15 2011, 06:08 AM


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Don, Excellent idea. I'd love to find stuff faster and easier. So much good stuff is posted here but there's no way i could bookmark it all like the laugher! Wow!

BUT...I could not open any of your archive links to take a look. What am I doing wrong? If I provide an e-mail, could you send me a link or must it be on the board? thanks. Gart
  Forum: Ideas & Suggestions · Post Preview: #32620 · Replies: 11 · Views: 18049

Gart
Posted on: Jun 5 2011, 04:46 PM


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QUOTE (gregoryagogo @ Jun 5 2011, 12:17 AM) *
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FF05Kmz7OWg

One on youtube is pretty good... I see you think that's too scratchy... Maybe I can clean it up too!


I can ripp it for you if you want a mp3....


Here's that version with a 'touch' of restoration... still a little scratchy:

Rudy Vallee - "I Never Dreamt"



Gregory: Very nice job! Thanks for taking the time and making the effort to clean up this copy. It's very good. I don't mind some hisses because it makes it all the more authentic. thanks again for the recording. Gart

  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #32607 · Replies: 3 · Views: 3188

Gart
Posted on: Jun 4 2011, 09:14 PM


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QUOTE (bob @ Jun 4 2011, 02:17 PM) *
Good that we are " Back In The Saddle Again" Thanks Dismuke for taking care of the problem.

rolleyes.gif Bob



Agree Bob with a tip of the stetson to Gene Autry! Do you see where James Arness just died. He was great and he scared my pants off as "The Thing."

Gart
  Forum: Announcements · Post Preview: #32604 · Replies: 3 · Views: 10420

Gart
Posted on: Jun 4 2011, 09:12 PM


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First, thanks to Dismuke for his dogged determination to get the DMB (Dismuke Message Board) up and running. I recommend that everyone read about his latest trials and tribulations under Announcements.

Now on to my search.

Many, many years ago (when the San Francisco Bay Area radio stations) played our kind of music, I taped the haunting version of 'I Never Dreamt' by Rudy Vallee. Very understated with the drummer using brushes to great effect at the beginning of the song.

There are a couple of copies on YouTube but they are horribly scratchy. I was wondering if anyone has a clean copy of this song that they'd be willing to share and make an old man happy in his final days. (OK, I'm not willing to give up yet--too many great old songs to listen to).

Best, Gart
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #32603 · Replies: 3 · Views: 3188

Gart
Posted on: Mar 12 2011, 08:24 PM


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This guy must have been a lot of fun to listen to. Another 'great' leaves us! Gart


From Saturday's New York Times

March 12, 2011

Danny Stiles, Radio Host Who Kept the Oldies New, Is Dead at 87

By RICHARD GOLDSTEIN

Danny Stiles, who brought back the music of yesteryear, spinning records for more than six decades on New York-area radio, died Friday in Manhattan. He was 87 and lived in Short Hills, N.J.

The cause was a respiratory ailment, said Gene Heinemeyer, a public affairs programming official for Multicultural Radio Broadcasting, whose station WPAT carried one of Mr. Stiles’s programs. Mr. Stiles was also broadcasting at New York Public Radio’s WNYC.

“I started collecting records when I was 13, and even then I was nostalgic,” Mr. Stiles once told The New York Times. “I went for Jean Goldkette and Isham Jones, and even then they were out of style.”

Mr. Stiles, who proclaimed himself the King of Nostalgia and the Vicar of Vintage Vinyl, unearthed gems from his collection of 200,000 or so recordings going back to the big band era of the 1930s and sometimes the Roaring Twenties. His personal odyssey took him through more than 20 radio stations, stacks of sometimes scratchy 78 r.p.m. records and countless standards from Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, the Dorsey brothers, Bing Crosby, Harry James and Paul Whiteman.

Broadcasting in his later years from “the east wing of the Art Deco penthouse” — he actually did his programs at studios in Lower Manhattan — Mr. Stiles waxed on about the musicians and singers he had known. But his musical taste extended beyond the personalities.

“I pick the songs that hit me in the heart; I pick by feeling. I concentrate on the record itself, not the songwriter, not the musician, but the whole thing,” he told The Times. “I concentrate on the song as I first heard it, what my listeners remember.”Mr. Stiles struck a personal chord with listeners, dedicating records to his fans, among them “the Lemon Ice King” and “Josie, the Bayonne Bunny.”

The Dean of Déjà Vu — yet another of Mr. Stiles’s self-styled sobriquets — evoked the times when his fans of a certain age had danced the nights away. As he put it, “In their minds I am speaking into a circular, spring-suspension carbon microphone.”

Many of his listeners were still out on the dance floor into their 70s or beyond for gatherings that Mr. Stiles hosted at places like the Red Blazer in Manhattan and Three Guys From Italy in Belleville, N.J.

For all the musical personalities he championed, Mr. Stiles relished a surprise offering, a rare find from his collection (often converted to CD because of its fragility).

Broadcasting one Saturday night last year on WNYC-AM as Mother’s Day approached, Mr. Stiles noted that he traditionally marked the occasion by playing Georgie Jessel’s “My Mother’s Eyes.” But this time he came up with a Connie Francis recording of “My Yiddishe Momme.”

He hoped his fans would spread the word that here was a radio man who offered a journey to the past they couldn’t find anywhere else on the dial. As he put it: “Tell your friends to tune in. If you get one, just one, we’ll double the audience.”

Mr. Stiles was born on Dec. 2, 1923, in Newark, where he grew up. After Navy service in World War II, he received an accounting degree from New York University, but he found the prospect of crunching numbers “painful” and embarked instead on a career in radio.

He got his first job in 1947 at WHBI in Newark. He was Midnight Dan, hosting a pre-dawn D.J. show and playing rhythm and blues music not often heard by white audiences. He gained wider attention at WNJR, also in Newark, as the host of “The Kit Cat Club” in the 1950s and ’60s, playing rhythm and blues and rock ’n’ roll. But the seeds of nostalgia were being planted.

“I always believed in counterpoint, doing what nobody else was doing,” he told The Star-Ledger of Newark. “If the Temptations had a hit, I’d play their hit from the year before.”

Mr. Stiles’s numerous stops also included WVNJ in Newark and WEVD in New York. While in his late 80s, slim and silver-haired, he was taping programs for four radio stations — WNYC, WNSW, WJDM and WPAT — each week.

Survivors include a son, Gary. His wife, Barbara, died in 1997.

Mr. Stiles wrapped up his programs with a blend of nostalgia, sadness and mirth. The evening would wind down with 8-year-old Shirley Temple singing “Goodnight, My Love.” Mr. Stiles sang along for the final verses, then bid “Goodnight, Shirley,” followed by a very personal tribute: “Goodnight, dear sweet Barbara.”

Then came a shift of mood for the finale, a ceremony marking “the closing of the huge mahogany door” to the Art Deco penthouse studio as Mr. Stiles, in the mind’s eye, struggled to carry off a crate of his old-time recordings, exclaiming, “These 78s are excruciatingly heavy.”


  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #19658 · Replies: 2 · Views: 4860

Gart
Posted on: Feb 4 2011, 01:17 AM


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I know he has been mentioned before lately, but I thought his obit was too good to pass up. Many of you old pros cite him all the time. He seems to have had a profound impact on the music we all love. Gart

From the New York Times (click on the URL and it has his picture) http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/25/arts/mus...rust&st=cse

January 25, 2011
Brian Rust, Father of Modern Discography, Dies at 88

By MARGALIT FOX

Brian Rust, a discographic detective who compiled comprehensive guides to recorded jazz and other popular music, in the process setting the standard for the modern field, died on Jan. 5 in Swanage, in southern England. He was 88.

The cause was complications of prostate cancer, said his son, Victor, who was named for the RCA Victor record label. (The elder Mr. Rust, according to family oral tradition, declined a friend’s suggestion that he name Victor’s twin sister Decca.)

Often described as the father of contemporary discography, Mr. Rust embarked in the 1940s on a rigorous, deeply personal project that continued long afterward as he haunted archives and hunted down artists to reconstitute long-vanished recording sessions on paper.

He was best known for “Jazz Records,” first published in 1952 and reissued many times since. It is currently available in a two-volume, 1,971-page version titled “Jazz and Ragtime Records, 1897-1942” (Mainspring Press, 2002), edited by Malcolm Shaw.

For decades, “Jazz Records” — known to jazz mavens simply as “J. R.” — has been the de facto standard reference work in the field, furnishing meticulous information on session dates, personnel and much else for tens of thousands of recordings.

Aimed at scholars and aficionados, the book has also been the starting point for countless reissues of early-20th-century jazz.

“Discography is a road map to the recorded past,” said Tim Brooks, who collaborated with Mr. Rust on “The Columbia Master Book Discography,” a four-volume work published in 1999. “Virtually any historical jazz reissue goes back first to Rust to find out what to look for — what recordings an artist made, how many versions of each that artist made and where they might have been issued, so you can get your hands on it. And he would trace all of that.”

“All of that” is now standard information in discographies across musical genres, and it is to Mr. Rust, colleagues say, that such comprehensiveness is owed.

“Jazz research at its beginnings was the purview of dedicated amateurs,” Bill Kirchner, a jazz musician and historian, said in an interview. “There was no precedent to dictate what the nature of it was going to be, and what the details were going to be. And he was really one of those people who decided, ‘This is what it should encompass.’ ”

Brian Arthur Lovell Rust was born in London on March 19, 1922. As a boy, he became enraptured by the jazz he heard on the radio and was soon spending all his pocket money on secondhand recordings.

At its height, his collection comprised 8,000 to 10,000 records — a somewhat modest haul by the standards of truly obsessed collectors. With benevolent indifference to the ravages of summer heat and winter cold, Mr. Rust stored them in an extension behind his garage.

“He was not a particularly painstaking person in terms of caring for stuff, though his mental work was extremely painstaking,” Mr. Shaw said.

As a young man, Mr. Rust took a job as a clerk in the Bank of England, which pleased his mother though not him. A conscientious objector, he was a firefighter in London during the Blitz.

After the war, he joined the staff of the BBC Gramophone Library, where he worked until about 1950. It was there, wishing to improve on the scanty discographies then available, that Mr. Rust began his private research in earnest.

Reconstructing a long-ago recording session is like trying to grasp a fistful of quicksilver. Mr. Rust first scoured record-company archives to compile his data; because files were often lost or incomplete, he eventually left the BBC, packed a suitcase full of rare European jazz records and set out for the United States.

Arriving in 1951, he sold the recordings to American collectors and used the money for bus fare, traveling the country in search of aging jazzmen, whom he proceeded to debrief. The result was “Jazz Records,” originally issued by Mr. Rust as a mimeographed loose-leaf volume.

In the decades that followed, Mr. Rust devoted his life to freelance music writing and discography, an unremunerative, solitary but, to him and his fellow travelers, deeply necessary enterprise. He worked quietly, away from the limelight, from his home in Swanage, a coastal town in Dorset.

“Brian lived sort of a hermit’s life,” Mr. Shaw said. “He was quite content with his own company and the company of other collectors and his family.”

His other work includes “The American Dance Band Discography 1917-1942” (1975), “British Music Hall on Record” (1979), “Discography of Historical Records on Cylinders and 78s” (1979) and legions of liner notes.

In the late 1950s and early ’60s, Mr. Rust played the drums in the Original Barnstormers Spasm Band, a British skiffle band.

In addition to his son, Victor, Mr. Rust is survived by his wife, the former Mary Denning; two daughters, Angela Kidd and Pamela Jackson-Cooke, (who escaped being named Decca); three grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

He is also survived by Brian, a discographic software program named for him. “Which is ironic,” Mr. Brooks said in an interview, “because he himself hated computers and never used them.”

  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #15695 · Replies: 3 · Views: 5480

Gart
Posted on: Dec 9 2010, 06:35 AM


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Gregory,

Thanks. That's one good idea. But I guess I didn't make my search quest clear. How to do you search this message board. Do you have to try to guess in which 'category' it might have been originally posted? Or will the search effort consider every message ever posted to find results?

Thanks again, Gart
  Forum: Ideas & Suggestions · Post Preview: #13909 · Replies: 3 · Views: 6033

Gart
Posted on: Dec 9 2010, 02:18 AM


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I hope this might be place to find out more about searching Dismuke's messages. My computer crashed and I have to start over with a number of songs I didn't save. Many of these were included in messages when people requested specific songs or lyrics. For example, in February 2007, Laughland kindly posted several songs by the Savoy Orpheans. Among others, he posted Five Foot Two, Whisper Song.

My question and challenge, if you choose to accept it, is: How do I search for these and others? Must I be in the correct 'category' for a search. Will one search, like a song title, check all categories?

Thanks for your help. And BACK UP!!!

Best and Happy Holidays to all, Gart in Oakland
  Forum: Ideas & Suggestions · Post Preview: #13905 · Replies: 3 · Views: 6033

Gart
Posted on: Feb 16 2010, 06:44 AM


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Aaron,

Another brilliant creation! You simply amaze me. Plus, the song is just super! Thanks. Gart
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #12881 · Replies: 2 · Views: 1851

Gart
Posted on: Feb 12 2010, 06:23 AM


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Great, great song!

Well, gentlemen, I AM from Nebraska. Born and raised in Lincoln, the capital city. It is a great place, but I sure like California (Oakland) a lot better. I couldn't take the heat and humidity anymore. I graduated from the University of Nebraska in Journalism and immediately moved West--first to Denver with United Press International and then to the San Francisco Chronicle for 18 years. My first 21 years were terrific and I wouldn't trade them for anything. Nebraskans love their football and are good-hearted people. Thanks for all the great songs. I may come back to ask for more particulars but it's 10:23 p.m. out here and I need to get up early...no, not to get the cows in, but to take care of my 5-year-old grandson is Belmont, across the Bay. Keep those Nebraska songs coming! And thanks!!! Gart
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #12837 · Replies: 20 · Views: 9772

Gart
Posted on: Aug 16 2009, 12:36 AM


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Thanks again to all of you who helped me find out more information about the non-available Volume 2 of Original Dance Music of the 1920s and 1930s. As you know I have Volume 1 and just love it. The songs on Volume 2 look super, too, but I couldn’t find it.

I decided to write Mr. Bill Hebden, the owner of Vintage Music Productions, who’s responsible for both volumes and much more, I discovered.

Mr. Hebden was very cordial and prompt in his response and he was also exceedingly helpful in my quest. Also, FYI, his Vintage Music Productions are a ‘must see’ for Dismuke music lovers. He sells a bunch of CDs through Worlds Records at 1-800-742-6663 or www.worldsrecords.com. Please check it out.

Gart in Oakland CA

  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #11976 · Replies: 7 · Views: 4868

Gart
Posted on: Jul 25 2009, 07:50 PM


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Thanks to all of you for your considerable help. I think I'm close to solving my problem.

And, I might ask the powers that be to eliminate the second reference to my post. I don't know how two of the same things got up there.

Thanks again, Gart
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #11912 · Replies: 7 · Views: 4868

Gart
Posted on: Jul 23 2009, 06:20 PM


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Terry,

Thanks for the information. I couldn't even find that much. I can't believe the CD listing is so incomplete--many tracks don't give the orchestra, for example I'm searching my files to see what songs I might already have. It is a shame that this isn't available. Meanwhile, I'll continue to search for something with more information even though this CD is no longer available. It does seem like a great CD and I enjoyed listening to snippets of these songs. Thanks so very much.

Gart in Oakland
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #11905 · Replies: 7 · Views: 4868

Gart
Posted on: Jul 22 2009, 04:30 AM


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Need your help again.

I have the CD that is Vol. 1 as described above. It was made by Swing Time Productions, 24 Fieldstone Drive, Hollis NH 03049-6564. It has 24 wonderful tracks. I was searching for Ambrose's "Leven-Thirty Saturday Night" on a recommendation from someone on the board and came across "Bonnie and Clyde: The Music They Lived and Died By." As I was listening to samples, I kept thinking I've heard these before. I ran to my CD collection and pulled out Vol. 1 and almost all, if not all, the songs on my CD are on the Bonnie and Clyde CD. Weird.

All this is a roundabout (and dull) way of saying that there was a Vol. 2. I don't know what songs are on it. But I did come across something somewhere (real helpful) that it was no longer in production.

1) Is this right? Can you no longer buy the CD?

2) Does anyone have Vol. 2? If so, what songs are on it?

Thanks, Gart in Oakland
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #11901 · Replies: 7 · Views: 4868

Gart
Posted on: Jul 22 2009, 04:30 AM


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Need your help again.

I have the CD that is Vol. 1 as described above. It was made by Swing Time Productions, 24 Fieldstone Drive, Hollis NH 03049-6564. It has 24 wonderful tracks. I was searching for Ambrose's "Leven-Thirty Saturday Night" on a recommendation from someone on the board and came across "Bonnie and Clyde: The Music They Lived and Died By." As I was listening to samples, I kept thinking I've heard these before. I ran to my CD collection and pulled out Vol. 1 and almost all, if not all, the songs on my CD are on the Bonnie and Clyde CD. Weird.

All this is a roundabout (and dull) way of saying that there was a Vol. 2. I don't know what songs are on it. But I did come across something somewhere (real helpful) that it was no longer in production.

1) Is this right? Can you no longer buy the CD?

2) Does anyone have Vol. 2? If so, what songs are on it?

Thanks, Gart in Oakland
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #11902 · Replies: 0 · Views: 1336

Gart
Posted on: Jul 6 2009, 11:45 PM


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Aaron,

Thanks for all the great songs and great information. I appreciate it.

For once (believe it or not) I can fill in a couple of blanks.

I Want to Be Bad - vocal by Sam Browne and two others (unidentified)
Glorianna - vocal by Clare Hanlon
For You - recorded April 7, 1931
Rippin' It Off - you covered all relevant details

Thanks! I look forward to your next effort.

Best, Gart
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #11827 · Replies: 5 · Views: 5079

Gart
Posted on: Jul 5 2009, 12:10 AM


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Aaron,

Another outstanding job. Your work is always worth watching and hearing. Ms. Stuart was another great-looking woman. She looked like Madonna in a couple of those pictures. And she looked better, the older she got (her hair was softened because of the more modern styles). What a tribute! I'll Google her to find out more.

Was wondering if you could separate post the songs you used in your tribute--complete with orchestras, vocals and dates?

Again, nice going!

Gart
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #11821 · Replies: 5 · Views: 5079

Gart
Posted on: Jun 30 2009, 05:15 AM


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This is the greatest group!

Greg H. came through like a champion. He had the classic The Ball Game or Life Is A Ball Game by Sister Winona Carr. It's a rousing gospel tune. Love it. The good Sister has a perfect raspy voice and she is accompanied by organ and drumgs. It's extraordinary.

Thanks a million, Greg.

I'm a happy -- and complete -- man today!

Hallelujah!!!

Gart in Oakland CA
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #11785 · Replies: 2 · Views: 6216

Gart
Posted on: Jun 23 2009, 12:05 AM


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This is not exactly in the time frame of our music, but I thought it worth a try. This song, very upbeat and fun, sure sounds like our vintage stuff but it was actually recorded in 1952 by Sister Winona Carr. I taped it long ago off a Dr. Demento broadcast and haven't heard it since. I'd love to get a MP3 copy or something I can transfer to a CD. Actually, she has a number of rousing songs that would be fun to listen to, but this is the one I'm currently interested in. By any chance can any of your creative and resourceful types can come up this one?

Thanks, Gart in Oakland
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #11770 · Replies: 2 · Views: 6216

Gart
Posted on: Jun 1 2009, 01:27 AM


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Just spotted this on the New York Times Web site. End of an era? Gart in Oakland, CA
Surprsingly, one entrant in my Ghoul Pool had her!!


June 1, 2009
Millvina Dean, Titanic’s Last Survivor, Dies at 97
By JOHN F. BURNS
LONDON — Millvina Dean, who as an infant passenger aboard the Titanic was lowered into a lifeboat in a canvas mail sack and lived to become the ship’s last survivor, died Sunday at a nursing home in Southampton, the English port from which the Titanic embarked on its fateful voyage, according to staff at the home.

She was 97 and had been in poor health for several weeks.

The youngest of the ship’s 705 survivors, Ms. Dean was only 9 weeks old when the Titanic hit an iceberg in waters off Newfoundland on the night of April 14, 1912, setting off what was then considered the greatest maritime disaster in history.

She survived with her mother, Georgetta, and 2-year-old brother when they, like many other survivors, were picked up by the liner Carpathia and taken to New York.

Her father, Bertram Dean, was among more than 1,500 passengers and crew members who died in the sinking, a fact that Ms. Dean, in an interview at the Southampton nursing home last month, attributed partly to the fact that the Dean family was traveling in third class, or steerage, as the cheapest form of passage was known.

Some versions of the disaster have contended that the crew was under orders to give priority aboard lifeboats to first- and second-class passengers, and even that doors were kept locked that would have given people in steerage faster access to the lifeboats through parts of the ship dedicated to higher-paying passengers. Though these assertions have been disputed, Ms. Dean said that she believed them to be true, and that her father might otherwise have survived.

“It couldn’t happen nowadays, and it’s so wrong, so unjust,” she said, emphasizing her point with a line from a Rudyard Kipling poem about class distinctions in the British Army in colonial India: “What do they say? ‘Judy O’Grady and the colonel’s lady are sisters under the skin.’ That’s the way it should have been that night, but it wasn’t.”

Mr. Dean, 29, who had been running a pub in London, was taking his family to a new life in Kansas City, Mo., where a cousin who immigrated before him had helped buy a tobacconist’s shop that Mr. Dean planned to run. But with the family breadwinner gone, his widow spent only a week in New York before returning with her children to England.

Millvina Dean — a name she used throughout her life, though she was christened Elizabeth Gladys Dean — spent her early years on a farm owned by her grandfather, a Southampton veterinarian.

She never married and spent her working life as an assistant and secretary in small businesses in Southampton. Among other jobs, she worked at a greyhound racing track and, during World War II, in the British government’s map-making office. For more than 20 years, until she retired, she worked in an engineering office.

The celebrity that came from being part of the disaster, and eventually living almost a century beyond it, was something she always had trouble grasping. She told visitors in later years that she was “such an ordinary person” that she found it surprising that anybody took much interest in her.

In the nursing home interview, she said that for decades after the sinking, she never spoke of it or her part in it to people she met or worked with. She said she had not thought it appropriate, partly because she remembered nothing about it and partly because she did not want to be seen as drawing attention to herself.

But that changed, she said, after Sept. 1, 1985, when a joint French-American team located the wreck of the Titanic, in water more than 2 miles deep, 370 miles east of Mistaken Point, Newfoundland. That set off a wave of interest in the ship and its fate that crested in 1996 with James Cameron’s blockbuster movie “Titanic,” starring Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio.

“Nobody knew about me and the Titanic, to be honest, nobody took any interest, so I took no interest either,” she said. “But then they found the wreck, and after they found the wreck, they found me.”

In the last 20 years of her life, she went to gatherings in the United States, Canada and a handful of European countries to participate in events related to the sinking.

Ms. Dean said all she knew of what happened during the sinking she had learned from her mother: “She told me that they heard a tremendous crash, and that my father went up on deck, then came back down again and said, ‘Get the children up and take them to the deck as soon as possible, because the ship has struck an iceberg.’ ”

On deck, mother and daughter were separated from father and son, and it was only at daylight, hours after they boarded the Carpathia, that she and her mother were reunited with her brother, Bertram Vere Dean. A carpenter, he died in 1997.

After failing health forced her to move to the nursing home, Ms. Dean, struggling to pay the residential cost of nearly $5,000 a month, began selling her Titanic mementos at auction, including a canvas mailbag that her mother used to carry the few belongings the family acquired during its week in New York.

She had hoped that the mailbag would prove to be the one used to lower her into the lifeboat, but when experts decided it was not, it brought only £1,500, about $2,400.

“Such a pity,” Ms. Dean said in the interview, with a quick smile. “If it had been the mailbag they used for me, it would have been £100,000!”

In recent weeks, news accounts of her plight caught the attention of Ms. Winslet and Mr. DiCaprio, and they, together with Mr. Cameron, contributed to the Millvina Fund, set up to meet the nursing home costs.

Ms. Dean died, on the 98th anniversary of the ship’s launching, without ever having seen the movie, which she attributed to reluctance to be reminded of what happened to her father. “It would have made me think, did he jump overboard or did he go down with the ship?’” she said. “I would have been very emotional.”

As for her own survival, she said that as a “very down-to-earth person,” she had little time for the metaphysical speculations urged on her over the years about why fate, or divine providence, had chosen her to survive the sinking as an infant, then allowed her to outlive everyone else who escaped.

“Heaven and hell — how can you believe in something up in the sky?” she said. Then, smiling again, she added, “Still, I’d love to be proved wrong.”



  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #11649 · Replies: 24 · Views: 15118

Gart
Posted on: Apr 21 2009, 05:14 AM


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Matt,

Thank you so very much for taking the time to dig out the singers on the Bernie records. I sincerely appreciate it.

Also, loved the 'waxes' and hope you'll send more our way.

Best, Gart
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #11522 · Replies: 4 · Views: 3612

Gart
Posted on: Apr 14 2009, 11:29 PM


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I'm a Titanic buff, but certainly no expert. I have several video tapes (remember them?) about the ship and its sinking. National Geographic had one that featured Bob Ballard and the discovery of the wreck. I must admit I skipped the James Cameron film.

I just finished--and highly recommend--"Titanic's Last Secrets" by Brad Matsen. He collaborated with two deep sea divers and produced a very fine book. I learned a lot I didn't know. Lots of history and, of course, some stuff about the dive that sounds scary. It's a semi-cheesy title, but it's a serious and very find book.

It sounds as if Mr. Vickery has read this book, too.

Gart in Oakland
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #11485 · Replies: 24 · Views: 15118

Gart
Posted on: Apr 14 2009, 11:21 PM


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Dismuke and Matt,

Thanks for being so generous on the Dismuke Hit of the Week with 11 (count 'em, 11!) Ben Bernie songs. Great sounds and great transcriptions. Very clear.

I grade them and I came up with eight songs with an 8! You Gotta Be a Football Hero came in at 8+. Just loved them and thanks so much.

Also, thanks for the lengthy information about Bernie. Didn't he also gain a certain amount of additional fame with a phony fued with Walter Winchell? (Believe I read that in Neal Gabler's huge book "Winchell: Gossip, Power and the Culture of Celebrity. Hey that's what's happening today.)

I was wondering, however, if you can identify the male singers on the records that didn't feature Ben Bernie. He has such a distinctive voice he's easy to pick out. I think Scrappy Lambert and Billy Hillpot were singers with his band, but I don't know if either of them sang on any of these 11 recordings.

I also enjoyed the quartet with "Here Comes the Sun." Interesting.

Would love in the future to hear more Ben Bernie, and some Anson Weeks!

Best and great job, Gart in Oakland
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #11484 · Replies: 4 · Views: 3612

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