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Roseman
post Aug 21 2007, 02:14 AM
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This post has been edited by Roseman: Mar 12 2010, 10:46 PM
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Ian House
post Aug 21 2007, 02:55 AM
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QUOTE(Roseman @ Aug 20 2007, 08:14 PM) *
Do people collect vintage jazz on 8-track cartridges?

If a train-station is where a train stops, what is a work-station?

Why do we drive on a parkway and park on a driveway?!!

Why is it called "cargo" when it's sent on a ship, and "shipment" when it's sent in a car?!!

Why do banks chain down their pens, yet leave their vaults wide open?!!


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Ian House
post Aug 21 2007, 03:07 AM
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Puzzler: Is a motor an engine? Or is an engine a motor?

Word origins: Don, do you know the origin of the terms "uppercase" and "lowercase" letters?



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This post has been edited by Ian House: Aug 21 2007, 03:09 AM


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Roseman
post Aug 21 2007, 03:21 AM
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Is that like Is a ship a boat? or Is a boat a ship? Sailors know the difference. I was taught that a boat could fit on a ship, but a ship will not fit on a boat.

.. or What kind of engine is in that motorboat?

Uppers and lowers...??? Does it have any thing to the font being above or below the line?


Don...
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laughland
post Aug 21 2007, 03:28 AM
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Ian,

If memory serves, UPPERCASE and lowercase are terms from the early days of printing - the printers had cases where they stored their pieces of type. The capital letters went in the upper case since the upper case was a longer reach and these letters were used less often...

This post has been edited by laughland: Aug 21 2007, 03:29 AM


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Ian House
post Aug 21 2007, 03:38 AM
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An engineboat? ... or ... "On Sunday, I have plans to go engining with some friends!"

_ _ _

Uppercase and Lowercase: It's a straightforward origin from the printing industry. The various types of typeface were kept in different drawers (or "cases") so it would be easy for the printers to prepare the plates. The capital letters, or "uppercase" letters were typically kept in the upper case of the desk -and the lower, the lower.

As with most of these word and phrase origins, they are often disputed. There may be other accounts... One such example originally comes from another printing term: "Mind your p's and q's" The printing origin refers to the fact that the letter "p" (the physical typeface) is almost exactly the same as a flipped "q" and would often get confused by the type-setters...

A different origin comes from pub history, when it comes to settling a bar tab. "Minding your pints and quarts"


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This post has been edited by Ian House: Aug 21 2007, 03:42 AM


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Ian House
post Aug 21 2007, 03:40 AM
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QUOTE(laughland @ Aug 20 2007, 09:28 PM) *
Ian,

If memory serves, UPPERCASE and lowercase are terms from the early days of printing - the printers had cases where they stored their pieces of type. The capital letters went in the upper case since the upper case was a longer reach and these letters were used less often...



Ha! You snuck your CORRECT answer in while I was typing my own explanation! Kudos, Sir :-)


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laughland
post Aug 21 2007, 03:41 AM
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QUOTE(Ian House @ Aug 20 2007, 10:38 PM) *
An engineboat? ... or ... "On Sunday, I have plans to go engining with some friends!"


Yes, that's all fine and dandy but How do I know it's Sunday? wink.gif

....(did I get the music playing again in your head with that?)

This post has been edited by laughland: Aug 21 2007, 03:41 AM


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Ian House
post Aug 21 2007, 03:45 AM
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QUOTE(laughland @ Aug 20 2007, 09:41 PM) *
....(did I get the music playing again in your head with that?)


Good Lord! It doesn't take much ... that is SUCH an outstanding tune. And I haven't enjoyed a YouTube video so much since the Bozzies in "Rock and Roll"...


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Roseman
post Aug 21 2007, 03:47 AM
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Speaking of type.. If you remember the days of yesteryear and the manual typewriters, then here's a site you might find interesting. You can simulate the clickety-clack sound of keys striking the platen by downloading the free Noisy Keyboard (tinyurl.com/2u94sj). Once installed, you can choose from seven different keystroke sounds. Now this will test those fancy computer speakers. laugh.gif laugh.gif

Don...
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laughland
post Aug 21 2007, 03:52 AM
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OK, how about a quick cartoon break?

Here's something to ponder: What looks and acts like a 1930s Fleischer cartoon but isn't one?

Answer? take a look at it here.... Toby the Pup in "Down South".
OK, I admit it - it's a lame attempt to plug my latest upload at Youtube.... smile.gif
(And Ian, maybe it'll get "Mississippi Mud" stuck in your head instead...)



Toby the Pup was a cartoon character produced by Charles Mintz 1930 and 1931. Mintz hired away two Fleischer animators to create these and it shows for Toby looks quite a bit like the Fleischer character Bimbo and the animation has much of the style of a Fleischer film. There were only about a dozen Toby cartoons made before they moved onto a new series featuring a character named Scrappy (but not Lambert).

If you are wondering about the German subtitles, well, this film was considered lost in the USA but several years ago a German translated version turned up as part of a syndicated package of public domain cartoons in Europe. It is the only surviving copy of this film to my knowledge.


OK, back to the regularly scheduled ramblings...

This post has been edited by laughland: Aug 21 2007, 03:59 AM


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Ian House
post Aug 21 2007, 04:03 AM
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What an identity crisis! Is it a Mintz cartoon, a Fleischer cartoon, or the second coming of "Steamboat Willie"?? I love the automatic smile making device :-)

"Mississippi, How Do I Know It's Sunday Mud?"

_ _ _

Hmmm, feeling decidedly silly this evening!...


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Ian House
post Aug 21 2007, 04:06 AM
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Don, I downloaded that typewriter keystroke sound effect utility... Um, is it easy enough to uninstall?


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Roseman
post Aug 21 2007, 04:09 AM
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Don't know. Have not try it, since I haven't installed it... Just thought it was interesting.
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Ian House
post Aug 21 2007, 04:26 AM
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Mississippi Mud Frankie Trumbauer And His Orchestra

Mississippi Mud Paul Whiteman And His Orchestra

Mississippi Mud Lee Morse and Her Blue Grass Boys





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This post has been edited by Ian House: Aug 21 2007, 04:27 AM


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