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Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Jun 12 2010, 05:32 AM


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Hello,

The title of that song in English is "For a Distant Journey." The version I have is by Alexander Tsfasman and his Jazz Orchestra, which was a late 30s-40s Russian band. Here is another Tsfasman song I found on Youtube, though I don't see an uploaded version of the specific recording of his you are looking for.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5E9n1NcRamk

  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #13404 · Replies: 3 · Views: 3828

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Apr 9 2007, 05:23 AM


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Nice!
  Forum: 78 RPM Records & Playback Equipment · Post Preview: #5874 · Replies: 3 · Views: 4606

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Feb 22 2006, 09:43 PM


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I would say that basically the entire jazz-pop interwar era is good. From about 1922-1939. If I had to pick one time from I like the most it would be 1924-1928
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #2937 · Replies: 43 · Views: 33629

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Jan 31 2006, 02:48 AM


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At times I feel like Seymour from "Ghost World," where I simply cannot connect to 99% of humanity and am stuck in a strange alternate universe where everybody speaks a different language. In many respects having taste is a detriment in today's culture which exalts lack of taste. Sometimes I almost wish I could be a normal "modern" and be fulfilled by watching football, eating at McDonald's, wearing jeans and living in an apartment furnished at K-mart. It would be strange to turn on the radio and hear music that I would like, or to be able to talk to people about current things and be able to "fit in."

Of course, anybody wearing spectator shoes and a bow-tie will probably not fit in today so I have just learned to accept it and enjoy my own personal world of good taste.
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #2773 · Replies: 26 · Views: 17233

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Dec 9 2005, 07:13 AM


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Every so often in certain Seinfeld episodes they have short bits of 20s-sounding jazz being played. Does anybody know what band played these and what songs they played?
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #2419 · Replies: 2 · Views: 4190

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Nov 15 2005, 03:49 AM


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QUOTE(Ian House @ Nov 11 2005, 09:40 PM)
4. Cracker Jack quality control (What ever happened to the peanuts? It's just caramel corn now)

I am not the only one! The whole theory about Cracker Jack is that you can get peanuts and caramel corn together because they go well together. Caramel corn by itself is entirely uninteresting. Every time I get Cracker Jack now it is usually just a bunch of caramel corn with a few peanuts sitting at the bottom of the box where I can't even get at them until the corn is gone.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #2313 · Replies: 19 · Views: 12165

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Nov 11 2005, 05:34 AM


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UT Austin school of law teaches on the "national" method just as you did. The teachers incorporate Texas law into the class as they see fit, but on the whole it is taught using national standards such as the UCC and the MPC and those are what apply on the exams. We still are taught by case law for the most part, although the casebooks usually have a bunch of notes and summaries about different subjects. Some casebooks have more of this than others.

I really don't have a problem with the caselaw method, I guess it is just a byproduct of being a common-law country where cases are so important. Nor do I have a problem with not learning a lot of Texas law, since I am pretty sure I want to start practice outside of Texas.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #2303 · Replies: 19 · Views: 12165

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Nov 10 2005, 06:16 PM


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That 1895 exam is pretty cool, but I don't see it as any more difficult than the stuff I had to do at that school age. The majority of that exam basically tests only memorization, which is probably the easiest and most useless of all educational skills. Where the 1985 exam falls short is in its lack of testing the analysis and critical thinking of the students. After going through high school, college and now being in law school it is more than obvious that knowing something which can be easiliy be looked up in a dictionary or encyclopedia is usually unnecessary. Obviously you need some foundation knowledge but it is only useful as it relates to some higher-level thinking.

For instance, I think it would be far more useful in the history portion of the test to write a well-layed out essay on the Revolutionary War issue then to answer any of the other questions. When you look at the time limits for each section the broadness and vagueness of the questions seems almost laughable. Do you honestly think you can "Show the territorial growth of the United States" in 5.6 minutes? Or relate the causes and effects of the Revolutionary War in that time period?

At best you might get a short paragraph about each question by the student, essentially a "short answer" question which considering the breadth of those topics would not show any amount of actual knowledge but only a recitation of the most important few dates, or terms the student knows.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #2298 · Replies: 19 · Views: 12165

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: May 8 2005, 11:28 PM


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Indeed, welcome Mr. Conaty!
  Forum: 78 RPM Records & Playback Equipment · Post Preview: #1585 · Replies: 19 · Views: 19642

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Apr 30 2005, 11:48 PM


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Hehe, thanks Miss.
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #1562 · Replies: 7 · Views: 6090

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Apr 30 2005, 11:39 PM


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I am not sure if this is exactly what you mean, but it was very common in the teens and twenties for records to have the "introducing" section where they would insert a bit of an entirely different piece of music. Personally, I think this is kind of neat.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #1561 · Replies: 26 · Views: 18470

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Apr 29 2005, 05:16 AM


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Welcome!
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #1549 · Replies: 7 · Views: 6090

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Apr 29 2005, 05:15 AM


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Dismuke should now be back at his normal abode, so far as I know.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #1548 · Replies: 64 · Views: 71086

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Apr 25 2005, 12:34 AM


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Well, I will make one more guess and say that number 4 is "Oh boy what a girl."
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #1501 · Replies: 64 · Views: 71086

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Apr 25 2005, 12:13 AM


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Is number 2 "Isn't it romantic?"
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #1497 · Replies: 64 · Views: 71086

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Apr 19 2005, 10:00 AM


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This is such a great idea. I hope we see round two soon.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #1447 · Replies: 35 · Views: 31965

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Apr 18 2005, 11:15 AM


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www.thefedoralounge.com is another site which is definately worth checking out if you are interested in vintage fashions from the 1920's through the 1940's. There are some very knowledgable people there.
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #1435 · Replies: 15 · Views: 11449

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Apr 15 2005, 06:06 AM


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You would think English recordings would still be popular in Europe. For instance, I really enjoy German music of the period even though I know almost no German at all. One can appreciate a vocal even if you don't understand the actual words.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #1376 · Replies: 38 · Views: 83938

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Mar 22 2005, 10:32 PM


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I agree Ian. People will always look after and take care of things they know are valuable and still enjoy. That is why such a large number of wonderful works of art have survived over the centuries even when the mroe mundane chattels of the societies that created them have disappeared.

Sometimes, really, I think the archivists are too far-sighted to see the effects of their policies and ideas. For instance, the Smithsonian (I think it was them, it might be the Library of Congress) is remastering contemporary music on 78rpm discs with the idea that even after World War III and nuclear winter, people will be able to figure out how to play a 78 even if they have no clue what to do with a CD or LP.

Personally, I think this is a really dumb idea. Honestly, would a pre-industrial society dependant on spring-wound phonographs really be that interested in listening to a 3 minute recording of Brittany Spears on a scratched up 78? I sort of doubt it. And I see the possibility of ever needing those 78s are remote in the first place.

A better plan would be to find some way of better using the museum's or library's collections currently as you said, trying to make sure the art or information doesn't die out.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #1213 · Replies: 17 · Views: 10750

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Mar 22 2005, 10:19 PM


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It is interesting that this came up, as last night I just finished reading "Sunday Nights at Seven" written by him along with parts written by his daughter. I never knew all that much about Jack Benny's personal life or the background of the show so it was a very interesting read.

I am a fan of his radio show, although I must say I have never seen much of his television shows or movies (I think I might have seen one, about 10 years ago)

My favorite episode is probably the episode where Peter Lorre is a guest star. Simply because I love Peter Lorre. I also really enjoy Rochester, he always steals the show in any episode where he is featured.
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #1212 · Replies: 8 · Views: 5874

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Mar 18 2005, 06:13 PM


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The problem with archives and museums is generally that once you give it to them, they box the stuff up and store it in some warehouse somewhere like at the end of that Indiana Jones movie. For instance, UT Austin has 300,000 78rpm records in their collection, and all of them are in remote storage and cannot be seen or heard by anybody.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #1194 · Replies: 17 · Views: 10750

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Mar 13 2005, 03:36 AM


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There is a great CD of Busby Berkeley Harry Warren tunes (a two CD set actually) that has the full-length movie versions called "Lullaby of Broadway."
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #1157 · Replies: 5 · Views: 4446

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Jan 30 2005, 10:26 PM


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I had to learn a bit about commercial radio in one of my marketing classes. Music radio stations in mass markets are so unbelievably competitive for market share and advertising dollars that they are very risk-averse. They have done studies that radio listeners will continue listening even if they hear the same song over and over again, or if they are ambivilant about the songs being played, but if they hear one song they dislike they will often tune to a rival station immediately. When you factor the pressure to promote songs which are being pushed by the record companies, you often get very bland radio stations. For instance, on "oldies" stations (one of the few types of music stations I listen to if I have no other alteratives) you find basically the same playlist no matter what city you are in, and the number of songs are very limited and are almost exclusivly well-known "classics." This is because the stations know that even though it may be the sixth time today that they have played Aretha Franklin's "Respect" it is better that people just get mildly bored than have the station take a risk and have the listeners tune to something else.
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #868 · Replies: 28 · Views: 21004

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Jan 30 2005, 03:43 AM


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If I ever become Bill Gates rich, with more money than sense, one of the things I would do is start my own AM radio station with a 20's and 30's format much like Radio Dismuke. That way, not only would it get the music more in the mainstream, I could listen to it on my period tube radios!

By the way, does anyone know if clicking the "thumbs up/thumbs down" buttons on Live365 does anything? Do broadcasters get statistics on how many people clicked what for each song?
  Forum: 1900 - 1940 General Topics · Post Preview: #861 · Replies: 28 · Views: 21004

Vladimir Berkov
Posted on: Jan 30 2005, 03:38 AM


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Carla Normand is the vocalist on a lot of the Royal Society Jazz Orchestra recordings, right? If so, I agree she is very good.
  Forum: Early 20th Century Popular Music · Post Preview: #860 · Replies: 4 · Views: 3731

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