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> Do you collect any old stuff from 1900 to mid-century?, Apart from music, I mean?
Shangas
post Apr 1 2008, 11:11 AM
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I've wanted to create this topic for a while. Who here collects items, antiques, vintage items, from the first half of the 20th century? Or perhaps from the 19th century? I'm thinking of stuff like first editions of books printed in the 1900-1950 period, radios, gramophones, musical instruments, records (please, not music specifically. I know we all have HUGE collections of those!!) Do you perhaps, collect vintage handwound watches? Or something else along lines such as these?

I find myself collecting vintage writing-instruments and other assorted bits of writing paraphernalia.

Amongst My Souvenirs are...

- Rocker-blotter. Wood wrapped with red leather. Circa 1940.
- Parker Duofold 'Big Red' two-bander fine-nibbed fountain pen. 1928.
- Waterman junior-size lever-filler fountain pen.**restoration project**. Circa 1936.
- Parker '51' Flighter fountain pen. Circa 1949.
- Glass pen-rest. Date unsure. Early 20th century. Gift from grandmother.
- Box of nibs and various pen-holders. Early 20th century. Date unsure.
- Glass and silver inkwell. Date unsure. Perhaps 1900s.
- Copy of 'The Old Curiosity Shop' by Charles Dickens. Circa 1910.
- Copy of 'Bleak House', by Charles Dickens. Circa 1910. (same publisher).

- Numerous radio serials, circa 1938-1955.

---

What other items of interest from the first half of the 20th century do you collect?

---

Yes, I do use all the items in my collection. My fountain pen collection is currently about 15 pieces. All of them in use. I've so far successfully restored four vintage fountain pens to working condition.


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Ian House
post Apr 1 2008, 05:13 PM
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Vintage fountain pens are so beautiful!

Shangas, that must be a very satisfying collection to maintain ...

_ _ _

I've enjoyed collecting for most of my life. Here are my main interests:




Vintage packaging and corporate ephemera:

I have hundreds of packages that date as early as late 19th Century and as late as the early 1960s. Naturally, I try to focus primarily on the 20s and 30s whenever possible. My first website experiment, which dates back to 1996, is still up on the web! I cringe every time I open it up; The photos are awful and the design is getting very tired. Someday, hopefully, I'll have time enough to update the site with a fresh new design and better photography.

The jewels: My favorite package from my collection is a fully intact carton of 5 cent Oh Henry! candy bars. Although the carton itself has an attractive design, the highlight of this package is its contents, 24 full-size unopened Oh Henry! bars with minimal oil-stain damage typically found on such an item. Finding such a complete specimen is extremely rare ... and will likely never happen to me again. Another jewel is a PRISTINE condition box of Lipton Tea from 1944 which is still packaged in its original shrink-wrap, not a scratch!

The hunt: I'm still looking for a pristine (white with no oil marks) Cracker Jack box -circa 1900-1920.





1939 New York World's Fair items:

I have a sizable collection of everything related to the 1939 NYWF including pamphlets, maps, guide books, souvenirs and original publications from the time.

The jewels: I have an original jacket, in excellent condition, worn by one of the "guide girls" similar to the one seen in this photo. Another treasure, which took several years to finally locate, is one of the original posters (this one)

The hunt: I might consider selling my soul to the Devil himself if I could ever find one of the official flags that flew at the Fair.




Golden Age Comic Books:

This was one of the first things that I started collecting as a kid -mostly Batman comics. I no longer add to this collection as the price tags have risen beyond my means. When I was a kid, I was able to collect some big ticket items for extremely low prices. This is no longer the case.

The jewels: Batman # 4 (autographed by Bob Kane), Batman #6, Batman # 15

The biggest disappointment:
Once, I was $2000.00 away from getting a nice copy of Detective # 27 (Batman's first appearance) but I couldn't convince my parents to participate (invest) in my obsession. Today, that same comic book is worth $450,000.00. Sigh!




Warner Brother Cartoons:

Always a lifetime passion, I have collected various items related to classical animation with a particular emphasis on Warner Bros. cartoons.

The jewels: A record album signed personally by Bob Clampett, Chuck Jones, Mel Blanc and Friz Freleng. I also own an original piece of Schlesinger studio writing paper.

The hunt: An original Robert McKimson Bugs Bunny model sheet would be nice!



Vintage Automobiles:

When I was living in California, I enjoyed owning a red 1965 Mustang Coupe and a black 1939 Cadillac LaSalle ... I had to sell both of them in order to relocate to the MidWest ... This collection was a little beyond my mechanical aptitude (next to none :-) to maintain for very long. They were both impulse buys needless to say ...



Miss Lee Morse:

Anything and everything I can get my hands on.

The jewels: scanned collection of family reunion photos, a signed studio photo, a test record ("Seems To Me" -1930)

The hunt:
Anything you can afford to contribute. (Thanks!) Whatever happened to her guitar, uke and banjo?


This post has been edited by Ian House: Apr 1 2008, 07:14 PM


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Shangas
post Apr 2 2008, 01:17 AM
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Oh it's lots of fun smile.gif

My collection:



Left, going down:

Waterman Phileas. Fine nib. C/C filler. Circa 1980.
Parker Duofold senior-size 'Big Red'. Fine nib. Button-filler. 1928.
**Waterman junior-size. Flexible italic nib. Lever-filler. Circa 1935.
**Platignum senior-size. Medium nib. Button-filler. Date unsure.
Montblanc Meisterstuck 145 'Chopin'. Fine nib. C/C filler. December, 2006.
**Pair of Vis-Pens. Fine nibs. Squeeze-fillers. Circa 1959.
Parker '45'. Medium flexible nib. Squeeze-filler. Circa 1970.
Parker '51' Flighter. Fine nib. Aerometric-filler. Circa 1949.

Right, going zig-zag:

Picasso 'Art Collection'. Fine nib. C/C filler. Brand new.
Jinhao. Fine nib. C/C filler. Date unsure.
Cross Metropolis. Medium nib. C/C filler. July, 2000.
Campo Marzio Minny. Fine nib. C/C filler. December, 2003.

Right:

Rocker blotter. Circa 1940.
Inkwell: Circa 1900.
Box of dip-pen nibs. Date unsure. Possibly turn of the century. NOS.

**These pens were bought in unusable condition and were restored to working condition by me. Hoping to find lots more in the future to restore and then perhaps sell.


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heer_bommel
post Apr 2 2008, 02:25 PM
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Apart from records, there´s not one particular item I collect. I do, however, have, several items from the 1910's, 1920's and 1930's.

-A Columbia Viva-Tonal Grafonola 109A portable windup gramophone (with Plano-Reflex tonearm) (from the late 1920´s, possibly 1928 or 1929)
-One Columbia medium tone needle tin (empty)
-One Western Electric candlestick phone (mouthpeace is from American Bell) from 1910's or 20`s. I don´t know if it works, but it has no dial, and is probably not suited for use on the Dutch telephone network.
-One Ericsson telephone from 1951 (working), but using the same design as the Siemens model from 1931.
-Several magazine ads for Victor and Columbia gramophones
-A small collection of 1920´s sheet music
-The first official Dutch telephone directory from 1915 (reprint). In those days there were people with a 1 (!!) digit telephone number!
-Dutch dictionary from 1920
-The "Picturegoer´s Who´s Who and Encyclopaedia" from 1933. Photo´s and small bio´s of famous movie stars of that year. Also a list of practically all films made in 1932, lots of articles, etc.

I´m also a big Laurel & Hardy fan, and have several L&H related items from the 1930's, 40`s and ´50´s (movies not included)
-A photograph of Laurel & hardy, signed by both of them, during their British Tour of 1952.
-One original bank check, signed by Stan Laurel on November 18th, 1930, for a payment of $ 15,95 to the Beverly Hills Battery Service. The check states Mr. Laurel´s address as 718, Bedford Drive, Beverly Hills. His phone number was Oxford 0614. (Does this phone number sound familiar? Check out their 1930 2-reeler "Blotto"!)
-An original programme of their stage performance in the Odeon Theatre in Southend-On-Sea, commencing Monday, August 4th 1952.
-Laurel & Hardy salt and pepper shakers by Beswick, 1930´s.
-A "Big Little Book" with a synopsys and photo´s of the L&H shorts "Going Bye-Bye", "Busy Bodies", "Them Thar Hills", "Dirty Work" and "Oliver the Eight", from 1932.
-Several L&H lobbycards from the 1930´s and 1940's.
-Original stationery from the Hal Roach Studios´s (1930´s, unused)

Some photo´s:










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Mareko
post Apr 2 2008, 05:30 PM
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... Heer Bommel wink.gif somehow I envy you for such a perfect grammophon as well as your shown telephone. Unfotunately my grammophone alike yours felt very much apart ... the mainspring was broken and the casing was more the weak (to much of using) - the bakelit telephone was broken because of its age and also by too much using/loving it by me as a child ... almost all my stuff of the time I've got from my family smile.gif I still have an electrical grammophon of the late '30's - a MW/LW operating "Bush" radio of the mid' 30's, a perfect working electrical "Singer" sewing-machine from 1927 - an electrical heater "Jackson", I like to call it "the poor man's fireside" - my grand-mother's "Kodak" photo-camera (ca. 1929) and my grand-father's film-camera (8mm - 1932) and the "Eumig" projector - my beloved typewriter "Remington noiseless" - some silver stuff like a cutlery and a beautiful art deco tabacco-box and more - some books (a few signed by the author) - one big and comfortable fauteuil and five designer chairs (1932) ... though, I tried with a programm, but it seems I can't upload a/some picture/s of 'em.

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heer_bommel
post Apr 2 2008, 05:58 PM
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QUOTE(Mareko @ Apr 2 2008, 11:30 AM) *
... Heer Bommel wink.gif somehow I envy you for such a perfect grammophon as well as your shown telephone. Unfotunately my grammophone alike yours felt very much apart ... the mainspring was broken and the casing was more the weak (to much of using) - the bakelit telephone was broken because of its age and also by too much using/loving it by me as a child ... almost all my stuff of the time I've got from my family smile.gif I still have an electrical grammophon of the late '30's - a MW/LW operating "Bush" radio of the mid' 30's, a perfect working electrical "Singer" sewing-machine from 1927 - an electrical heater "Jackson", I like to call it "the poor man's fireside" - my grand-mother's "Kodak" photo-camera (ca. 1929) and my grand-father's film-camera (8mm - 1932) and the "Eumig" projector - my beloved typewriter "Remington noiseless" - some silver stuff like a cutlery and a beautiful art deco tabacco-box and more - some books (a few signed by the author) - one big and comfortable fauteuil and five designer chairs (1932) ... though, I tried with a programm, but it seems I can't upload a/some picture/s of 'em.


Thanks! I also really love my gramophone. It sounds great for such a small machine, and it is in good condition, and all original. I bought it from a dealer who specializes in 78 rpm records and vintage talking machines. It was a real bargain, because apparently most people nowadays who are in the market for such a machine prefer HMV´s, because they have Nipper.

The telephone was also a bargain. I suspect it was that cheap because I think it´s not 100% original. The base is from Western Electric, the mouthpeace from American Bell, and the "stick" part is a different color, so I suspect some parts were damaged during the years and replaced with spare parts from other brands.

In order to post pictures, you have to uplosd them first to another website (for instance, photobucket.com), then click on the icon that says "insert image", and copy the url of your picture to the little pop-up window.
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Shangas
post Apr 2 2008, 10:32 PM
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Until she sold it, my grandmother owned an absolutely ANTIQUE 'SINGER' brand sewing-machine. It was a huge, black monster with this heavy, domed wooden lid that locked with a key. The entire thing weighed a bloody ton. I don't know HOW she managed to lug it around. Such machines are not kind to little old ladies...


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Tiffany
post Jun 30 2008, 02:10 PM
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QUOTE(heer_bommel @ Apr 2 2008, 09:25 AM) *
Apart from records, there´s not one particular item I collect. I do, however, have, several items from the 1910's, 1920's and 1930's.

-A Columbia Viva-Tonal Grafonola 109A portable windup gramophone (with Plano-Reflex tonearm) (from the late 1920´s, possibly 1928 or 1929)
-One Columbia medium tone needle tin (empty)
-One Western Electric candlestick phone (mouthpeace is from American Bell) from 1910's or 20`s. I don´t know if it works, but it has no dial, and is probably not suited for use on the Dutch telephone network.
-One Ericsson telephone from 1951 (working), but using the same design as the Siemens model from 1931.
-Several magazine ads for Victor and Columbia gramophones
-A small collection of 1920´s sheet music
-The first official Dutch telephone directory from 1915 (reprint). In those days there were people with a 1 (!!) digit telephone number!
-Dutch dictionary from 1920
-The "Picturegoer´s Who´s Who and Encyclopaedia" from 1933. Photo´s and small bio´s of famous movie stars of that year. Also a list of practically all films made in 1932, lots of articles, etc.

I´m also a big Laurel & Hardy fan, and have several L&H related items from the 1930's, 40`s and ´50´s (movies not included)
-A photograph of Laurel & hardy, signed by both of them, during their British Tour of 1952.
-One original bank check, signed by Stan Laurel on November 18th, 1930, for a payment of $ 15,95 to the Beverly Hills Battery Service. The check states Mr. Laurel´s address as 718, Bedford Drive, Beverly Hills. His phone number was Oxford 0614. (Does this phone number sound familiar? Check out their 1930 2-reeler "Blotto"!)
-An original programme of their stage performance in the Odeon Theatre in Southend-On-Sea, commencing Monday, August 4th 1952.
-Laurel & Hardy salt and pepper shakers by Beswick, 1930´s.
-A "Big Little Book" with a synopsys and photo´s of the L&H shorts "Going Bye-Bye", "Busy Bodies", "Them Thar Hills", "Dirty Work" and "Oliver the Eight", from 1932.
-Several L&H lobbycards from the 1930´s and 1940's.
-Original stationery from the Hal Roach Studios´s (1930´s, unused)

Some photo´s:













I have to say Wow!!!!!!!

I collect family photo's and have so many it's amazing. (Considering I had none to start with) . I now have phot's of my grandmother, G-Grandparents, GG-Grandparents and 2 of my ggg-grandfather. So this was an awesome find, and priceless.

The down side is : I have many photo's of a man named Sherman Bernard Fanning whom was a Jazz/ Big Band muscian , that I can't find much on. He played Tenor Sax with many different bands so I'm still researching him. It's odd I have everything on this man baby book, baby photo's, band photos, scrap book, and his adult photo's. But theres no record on how he's related to my family. And I will say the scrap book is WOW many photo's of early Jazz bands.
Now it's just a matter of finding the info I need and appraising his stuff to sell.
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Shangas
post Jul 1 2008, 01:13 AM
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Don't worry about this...

This post has been edited by Shangas: Jul 1 2008, 02:11 AM


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Victor C. Brunsw...
post Jul 2 2008, 07:23 AM
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Most of my collection is in the form of vintage books. I collect technical and hobby books published before World War II -- among them are a number of books on radio published in the early 1920s. I also have some early books on model airplanes which are somewhat rare because it seems as if relatively little was written on the subject in the first place -- on the other hand there are tons of books on model trains and ships.

Another gem in my collection is a Long Beach (California) Polytechnic High School yearbook, Class of 1929, signed by Spike Jones. In addition to his class picture -- he's listed as Lindley Jones -- there's also a couple of pictures of him in a group shot of the school band (he played drums).
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Matt Carr
post Jul 11 2008, 06:38 PM
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I dont necessarily collect any one thing. Sure i have a few Fountain pens, one is a mandarain yellow lucky curve which i love. From furniture to clothing to odds and ends i just like living with the past, but not in it.
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Shangas
post Jul 13 2008, 11:26 AM
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A beautiful fountain pen to be sure...



Circa 1928 Parker Duofold senior-size in Mandarin Yellow

...but regrettably extremely fragile. How much did you pay for it? Does it work? Do you use it?


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Guest_tdyer_*
post Feb 14 2009, 02:09 PM
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I have a unopened box of cracker jack the side has printing on it 26JUL05353101904, Collector Series Prize Inside. Any idea of it's worth?


QUOTE (Ian House @ Apr 1 2008, 12:13 PM) *
Vintage fountain pens are so beautiful!

Shangas, that must be a very satisfying collection to maintain ...

_ _ _

I've enjoyed collecting for most of my life. Here are my main interests:




Vintage packaging and corporate ephemera:

I have hundreds of packages that date as early as late 19th Century and as late as the early 1960s. Naturally, I try to focus primarily on the 20s and 30s whenever possible. My first website experiment, which dates back to 1996, is still up on the web! I cringe every time I open it up; The photos are awful and the design is getting very tired. Someday, hopefully, I'll have time enough to update the site with a fresh new design and better photography.

The jewels: My favorite package from my collection is a fully intact carton of 5 cent Oh Henry! candy bars. Although the carton itself has an attractive design, the highlight of this package is its contents, 24 full-size unopened Oh Henry! bars with minimal oil-stain damage typically found on such an item. Finding such a complete specimen is extremely rare ... and will likely never happen to me again. Another jewel is a PRISTINE condition box of Lipton Tea from 1944 which is still packaged in its original shrink-wrap, not a scratch!

The hunt: I'm still looking for a pristine (white with no oil marks) Cracker Jack box -circa 1900-1920.





1939 New York World's Fair items:

I have a sizable collection of everything related to the 1939 NYWF including pamphlets, maps, guide books, souvenirs and original publications from the time.

The jewels: I have an original jacket, in excellent condition, worn by one of the "guide girls" similar to the one seen in this photo. Another treasure, which took several years to finally locate, is one of the original posters (this one)

The hunt: I might consider selling my soul to the Devil himself if I could ever find one of the official flags that flew at the Fair.




Golden Age Comic Books:

This was one of the first things that I started collecting as a kid -mostly Batman comics. I no longer add to this collection as the price tags have risen beyond my means. When I was a kid, I was able to collect some big ticket items for extremely low prices. This is no longer the case.

The jewels: Batman # 4 (autographed by Bob Kane), Batman #6, Batman # 15

The biggest disappointment:
Once, I was $2000.00 away from getting a nice copy of Detective # 27 (Batman's first appearance) but I couldn't convince my parents to participate (invest) in my obsession. Today, that same comic book is worth $450,000.00. Sigh!




Warner Brother Cartoons:

Always a lifetime passion, I have collected various items related to classical animation with a particular emphasis on Warner Bros. cartoons.

The jewels: A record album signed personally by Bob Clampett, Chuck Jones, Mel Blanc and Friz Freleng. I also own an original piece of Schlesinger studio writing paper.

The hunt: An original Robert McKimson Bugs Bunny model sheet would be nice!



Vintage Automobiles:

When I was living in California, I enjoyed owning a red 1965 Mustang Coupe and a black 1939 Cadillac LaSalle ... I had to sell both of them in order to relocate to the MidWest ... This collection was a little beyond my mechanical aptitude (next to none :-) to maintain for very long. They were both impulse buys needless to say ...



Miss Lee Morse:

Anything and everything I can get my hands on.

The jewels: scanned collection of family reunion photos, a signed studio photo, a test record ("Seems To Me" -1930)

The hunt:
Anything you can afford to contribute. (Thanks!) Whatever happened to her guitar, uke and banjo?

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victrolajazz
post Feb 14 2009, 10:34 PM
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Since I was six years old and my father presented me with my first 1/25 scale model of a tan 1950 Studebaker Starlite Coupe made by AMT, I've been addicted to scale model automobiles. Of course I collected them avidly throughout my early and teen years as my parents and allowance would permit, but thought I'd outgrow the desire for them as soon as I was able to have the real thing. That didn't happen--I'm still as enthralled with scale model cars as ever--it's the idea of having an exact replica of the real thing that I never outgrew. I have none of my original models, but have obtained some exact replacements as follows:

This is a hideously painted but similar model that I have a perfect example of with the box of the 1950 Plymouth Suburban Station Wagon in 1/20 scale--my model is tan--both tailgate and rear window open and the back seat can be lowered by means on levers on the bottom:

1950 Plymouth Suburban made by Product Miniature Co., Inc.

This is a Dinky Toy 1948 Plymouth Estate Wagon in about 1/32 scale which I've been able to get a perfect example of:

Dinky Toy 1948 Plymouth Estate Wagon in 1/32 scale

Since I own a real 1956 Cadillac Coupe de Ville, I've obtained about 17 1/25 AMT scale models of this car in various color combinations, both with and without interiors. Here's a recent purchase off eBay:

AMT 1956 Cadillac Coupe de Ville 1/25 scale in black and lavender with interior

Of course, every one of these models were "Made in USA", something we'll probably never see again, sadly.

Eddie the Collector




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Ian House
post Feb 15 2009, 03:17 AM
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QUOTE (tdyer @ Feb 14 2009, 09:09 AM) *
I have a unopened box of cracker jack the side has printing on it 26JUL05353101904, Collector Series Prize Inside. Any idea of it's worth?



Hi Tdyer,

Welcome to the board!

Can you give us a better description of your Cracker Jack package ...? From what you've provided, it sounds a little like a relatively recent commemorative or "limited edition" package. Does it have a UPC symbol on it. Who is the manufacturer? (Frito-Lays? Bordens?) If so, it is, indeed a modern package and, as such, the value is likely to be negligible. (I do NOT know this for certain -just a guess. I do not, knowingly, collect any packaging post 1969 and, therefore, I am not certain about the collectible value of such a piece.)

The Cracker Jack package evolved through a series of distinctive milestones in its history which makes the "ballpark" dating of a particular specimen a little easier. Look for the elements on the package and compare it to this chronology:

1899: first wax-sealed box
1902: manufactured by Rueckheim Bros. & Eckstein
1912: prizes were introduced
1918: red, white and blue design - Sailor Jack & Bingo (the dog) were added to the graphics.
1922: manufactured by The Cracker Jack Company
1960: the familiar photographic collage of popcorn and peanuts were introduced.
1964: manufactured by Bordens
1997: manufactured by Frito-Lay

_ _ _

I am a serious collector of vintage packaging ... and, I know that the value of any specimen is what I am willing to pay for it. In other words, I don't think that there is any one "official" value of an item. I think it may be the same thing for 78 collectors.

When collecting Cracker Jack boxes, the biggest challenge is to find an authentic piece that is not soiled by oil stains. Generally, the value of a vintage package goes WAY up when the original product content is still intact (whatever it may be: ink in a bottle, pencils in a carton, soda in a bottle, powder in a tin, etc) ... but full CJ boxes of an historic vintage almost ALWAYS have oil stains on the box. For me, this takes away from the value of the package (a rare instance of such an occurrence) ...

In my entire "collecting life", I have only seen one pre-WWI specimen of a CJ box (without product content) in pristine condition. The dealer was selling it, combined with a specially designed tin truck which was originally used for promotional purposes, for $500.00. I had no interest in the tin truck and offered her $300.00 for the CJ package by itself. Unfortunately, she would not separate the two and I, eventually, gave up on the deal. This has been my BIGGEST regret ever since! I have never seen the same quality specimen again. If I could re-live that moment, I would have paid the $500.00 for that Cracker Jack box ... so, for me, that would be the value of that one particular piece. That was about 15 years ago -so the price might even be a little steeper. But, to somebody else, who may have an antique shop full of CJ boxes from 1910, well, the value may be a little more affordable ...

_ _ _

However, if the package was from 1975, I don't think I'd pay 15 bucks for it ...


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